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NYU Shanghai Professor and Colleagues Create a New Type of Quasicrystal

Pilkyung Moon, an assistant professor of physics and a member of the NYU-ECNU Institute of Physics at NYU Shanghai, working in collaboration with a research group from Sungkyunkwan University, have succeeded in creating a new kind of  quasicrystal.  In research featured on the cover of Science, Moon and his colleagues reported that a new kind of quasicrystal can be designed by the overlay of two periodic layers at a specific configuration.

Solid-state materials are composed of atoms. For a long time, it had been believed that periodicity is essential to arrange atoms in an ordered fashion, and such arrangement was named a crystal. In a two-dimensional space, for example, only a few arrangement patterns, i.e., triangular, rectangular, or hexagonal arrangement, can tile space without vacancy in a periodic manner.

In 1970s and ’80s, however, researchers discovered very rare patterns which can tile space in an ordered but not periodic fashion. Such novel arrangement was newly named a quasicrystal, and has greatly expanded our understanding of the atomic order. However, quasicrystals are quite rare in nature.

Professor Joung Real Ahn’s group in Sungkyunkwan University developed an innovative idea to grow two hexagonal (graphene) layers at exactly 30°, and measured various physical properties.

Professor Moon’s theoretical calculation proved that the scattering pattern observed in the experiment can appear only at exactly 30°, and even a slight deviation of the angle (e.g., 29.958°) cannot reproduce the observed pattern. This result provides solid evidence of the fact that the research team’s system is at quasicrystalline configuration. In addition, the theoretical investigation also revealed many exotic features of quasicrystals such as the emergence of infinitely many Dirac cone replicas as well as the unusually strong scattering.

The discovery of this new kind of designer quasicrystal will expand knowledge about atomic order by enabling the systematic studies on the structures lying between periodic systems and non-periodic systems. Research findings in this study will enable scientists to build a theoretical model that can describe the physical properties of this novel structure without relying on the approximations used in the conventional quasicrystal research.

Journal Reference:

Sung Joon Ahn, Pilkyung Moon, Tae-Hoon Kim, Hyun-Woo Kim, Ha-Chul Shin, Eun Hye Kim, Hyun Woo Cha, Se-Jong Kahng, Philip Kim, Mikito Koshino, Young-Woo Son, Cheol-Woong Yang, Joung Real Ahn, “Dirac Electrons in a Dodecagonal Graphene Quasicrystal”, Science, doi: 10.1126/science.aar8412 (2018)

This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai. You can read the original here.

NYU Shanghai Course Focuses on Recycling Plastic – Re-Made in China

More than two billion tons of solid waste is generated every year by the world’s cities — a challenge that if left unaddressed, will continue to have serious health, safety and environmental consequences. This semester, nine IMA students accepted the challenge of “learning everything about plastic and plastic pollution” and finding ways to sustainably upcycle it in a new course, Re-Made in China.

“Our goal is to become as knowledgeable as possible about our subject, and to come up with viable project ideas and prototypes that can be sustainable and fair business models generating a positive social impact for local communities,” says Clinical Instructor of Arts Marcela Godoy.

The two-credit course, guided by the principles of sustainable design philosophy, will introduce students to both traditional and new technologies to address social and environmental problems. The goal is to remake plastic waste into “something valuable and even extraordinary,” be it accessories, handcrafts or an art project.

In class, students are divided into 3 groups: one focusing on developing machines to process plastic, such as shredding and melting; another experimenting with what materials plastic can be transformed into; and the third on designing new products. “I want students to work together like a design firm, where we learn about plastic together and collaborate on projects,” Godoy says.

Suhyeon Lee ‘19, who took Godoy’s class on Digital Fabrication last semester and has signed on for Remade in China, says she is excited about learning what can be done with the overflow of trash. “I am going to gather discarded materials and combine them to produce an object that we can enjoy again — either an artistic sculpture, musical instrument, daily necessity, or even something personal that is meaningful to someone.”

Godoy’s idea of recycling emerged in 2012, when she was working in New York at YesYesNo, a studio for interactive arts and technology projects. She noticed the huge amount of waste generated from projects, and decided to upcycle the materials to make necklaces and other accessories.

“How ironic that things to make people feel beautiful can be made out of the opposite,” she says.

Marcela Godoy on the right, showing a student how to use the plastic shredder that she built.

Godoy is encouraging her students to become even more deeply engaged with the community they live in, by assigning projects that take them out of the classroom, such as creating “trash maps” tracking plastic trash routes through Shanghai.

“I am going to invite a person who collects recyclables from trash in Shanghai to share his experience,” Godoy says, “Students will then be assigned to research and interview people on their own to find out where the plastic trash is produced and disposed of.”   

Godoy also plans to invite seasoned designers from Precious Plastic Shanghai,a social enterprise devoted to raising plastic pollution awareness in China, to offer hands-on coaching to students in a workshop later in November. Godoy worked with the team after moving to China in 2015.

At the end of the course, Godoy plans to launch a “Re-Maker Space” for the benefit of the whole NYU Shanghai community, where all students and faculty can drop by to process plastic and make something valuable of their own.

The seven-week course is expected to conclude on December 11. Following the end of the semester, Godoy will present her class’ work at the Precious Plastic WANA Conference in Abu Dhabi on December 16-17.  

 

This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai and the original can be found here.

NYU Shanghai Hosts Workshop on Holocaust Studies

This week, scholars from around the world gathered on campus to discuss and present new research at NYU Shanghai’s first-ever workshop on Holocaust studies. Co-hosted by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum(USHMM), the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum (SJRM), and NYU Shanghai, the workshop focused on the role the city and people of Shanghai played in harboring Jewish refugees during World War II and the lasting legacy of that act of generosity.

“Historically, Shanghai has always been a welcoming city and providing shelter to the Jewish refugees may have been its greatest ever act of welcome,” said Provost Joanna Waley-Cohen. “Today, in many parts of the world, we are again witnessing large-scale and sometimes forceful displacement of people, with refugee camps becoming even more commonplace. The need to understand the mistakes and tragedies of the past, and to cultivate compassion and support for refugees has never been more urgent.”

Chen Jian, director and curator of the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum

The five-day workshop showcased more than a dozen research projects, ranging from literary narration and memorialization of the Holocaust to the impact of gender in German literature of the Holocaust. Leading historians such as NYU Professor of History David Engel and Chen Jian, director and curator of the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum, presented, led, and participated in discussions throughout the week.

Waley-Cohen said the workshop not only presented junior academics with an important opportunity to share new, original, and unpublished research, it also introduced participants to the Holocaust Museum’s rich and underutilized archival materials.

In his remarks, Chen spoke of how SJRM is devoted to commemorating Shanghai’s historic role in sheltering Jewish refugees in the 1930s and 1940s, and to ensuring that Shanghai’s experience becomes part of a global conversation.

“The relevance of the Holocaust to China’s history and culture lies in the fact that, during a time of need, China was able to provide emotional and tangible support to Jewish refugees who looked to settle down here,” Chen said.

Yong-jian Zhao, a lecturer of history at Zhejiang Gongshang University, recalled the lives of  “Jewish friends of China” such as Israel Epstein and Sydney Shapiro who were among 20,000 Jewish refugees who found a safe haven in Shanghai during the war. Unlike their fellow refugees, Epstein and Shapiro chose to remain in China after the war, embracing the goals of the Chinese Communist Revolution.

“I want to explore the origins of this group, to identify reasons for China’s appeal to Epstein and Shapiro and to other Jews like them, and to explore how they, looking back after years of living in China, assessed their own lives and their Jewishness,” Zhao said.

During the week, workshop participants visited the Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum in Hongkou district, where they were introduced to the research tools and resources available at both the SHRM and the USHMM.

NYU Professor of History David Engel

In his presentation on Monday, Engel, the Maurice R. and Corinne P. Greenberg Chair of Holocaust Studies and Professor and Chair of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at NYU, made a forceful argument for why Holocaust studies should be relevant to people of all backgrounds and nationalities. He addressed questions that some Americans have been asking for decades: Why did the US government spend millions of dollars on building a museum that chronicles the history of an event that did not happen in their homeland?

Professor Engle encouraged the audience to reflect on “not so much what does the Holocaust say as about me as a member of ‘Group X’ or ‘Y’, but what does the Holocaust say about me as a human being, unlabeled, unidentified?”  

By considering the events of the Holocaust as a human being as opposed to a member of a country that had little to do with the horrors of World War II, the event becomes a lot more relevant to each of us, he said.  

The workshop concluded on 19 October.

 

This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai and the original can be found here.

NYU Shanghai Professor Zhang Zheng to Head Amazon’s New AI Lab in Shanghai

NYU Shanghai Professor of Computer Science Zhang Zheng has been appointed Director of Amazon Web Services’ (AWS) newly-opened Shanghai Artificial Intelligence Lab, where he will lead the company’s advanced research and development of deep learning.

AWS made the announcement on September 17 at the 2018 World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai, shortly after Zhang, a U.S. citizen, became the first foreigner to receive a work permit from the Pudong government allowing him to hold simultaneous positions at Amazon and NYU Shanghai.

An award-winning expert in the theories and practices of large-scale distributed computing and its intersection with machine learning, Zhang held significant positions at Microsoft and Hewlett Packard prior to beginning his career at NYU Shanghai in 2013.

At Amazon, Zhang, who will maintain his appointment at NYU Shanghai but take a leave of absence from his university duties, plans to build a lab that researches natural language processing with a special focus on Chinese. He also hopes to engage and develop an open-source deep learning ecosystem and advise Chinese customers on machine learning and AI adoption.

“I’m honored to join the AWS AI Lab Shanghai, where, together with some of the world’s brightest minds, we will have the opportunity to spur innovation, make technologies easy, fast, and useful for Chinese organization of all sizes,” Zhang said.

“One of the areas I will emphasize is fundamental research via a lab with global culture, and do so in tight collaboration with major universities in Shanghai, including NYU Shanghai,” he added.

Earlier this month, the Exit-Entry Administration of the Pudong Public Security Bureau, as part of its efforts to attract high-end foreign talent, issued Zhang its first-ever work permit allowing foreigners to work part-time in the Shanghai Free Trade Zone. NYU Shanghai Chancellor Yu Lizhong applauded the new policy.

“As a research university, NYU Shanghai encourages its faculty to conduct further research on cutting-edge frontiers and help cultivate global talent,” he said. “The fact that Professor Zhang can now play a key role in the research and development of a leading industry is of great value to the university, enabling us to strengthen our  partnerships with leading companies.”

Professor Zhang is not the first NYU Shanghai community member to take advantage of the government’s efforts to clear hurdles and enable more foreign citizens, particularly innovators and entrepreneurs, to work in Shanghai. Last June, Tyler Rhorick ‘17 became the first international student to obtain a work permit under a new policy allowing foreign graduates of Chinese-accredited universities such as NYU Shanghai to obtain visas to work in Shanghai’s Free Trade Zone. Rhorick now works in NYU Shanghai’s Student Life Office.

Another alumna, Lathika Chandra Mouli ‘17, an Electrical Engineering major, obtained a new “Talent Visa” from the Shanghai Yangpu district that is reserved for recent college graduates employed by startups or Fortune 500 companies. Mouli joined Energo Labs, a blockchain startup, as a project specialist after graduation.

 

This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai. The original can be found here

NYU Shanghai Making an Impact with Deans Service Scholars

The 2017-2018 Deans Service Scholars program is open to all NYU Shanghai students and allows selected scholars the opportunity to learn about community development and service through a progressive learning experience. This experience includes classroom interaction, direct service, and travel.

This year’s DSS program spanned the topics of health, education, environmental protection and community development in Anhui, Hunan, Yunnan and Cambodia, respectively. Here’s what our DSS students saw and did this year:

 
1. Chi Heng Foundation (CHF) 智行基金会

Our DSS Group had a memorable experience in Anhui with our visits to an orphanage, home visits to HIV-affected families, visit to a village affected by HIV, and interacting with the Chi Heng students. 

As part of Qing Ming Festival, we held a kite decorating activity where we asked HIV-affected children to draw their hopes and dreams for the future. Some shared dreams about becoming a music star, others dreamed for world peace and good health. We then flew our kites and watched as we flew our dreams to the sky.

2. PEER 毅恒挚友计划

Group photo of DSS PEER group on the last day in Yuanling NO.6 High School 沅陵县第六中学
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The DSS scholars on a visit to a local community in Cambodia. NYU Shanghai students taught at Sunrise English school for two days.

4. ​Yunnan Green Environment Development Foundation (YGF) 云南省绿色环境发展基金会

 Students planted trees to provide food for the endangered snub-nosed monkey.
A group picture after planting trees on Snow Mountain:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DSS YGF students share unique cultural experiences with Uncle Yu, a local farmer who has been working for 20 years to protect the mountain’s snub-nosed monkeys: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai. You can read the original here.

Commencement across the world!

It is the time for celebrating graduating students across NYU’s global network. The All-University Commencement Exercises will take place on Wednesday, May 16 at Yankee Stadium in New York. 

 

 

 

 

NYU Abu Dhabi’s 5th Commencement ceremony will be held on Sunday, May 20 at its campus on Saadiyat Island.

 

 

 

 

 

NYU Shanghai’s second Commencement ceremony will take place on Wednesday, May 23 at the Shanghai Oriental Art Center.

Impacting Aerospace History – NYU Shanghai Professor Alexander Geppert Named Aerospace History Chair at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

Professor Alexander Geppert, a leading historian of Europe, has recently been named the Charles A. Lindbergh Chair in Aerospace History at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC for the year 2019–20, a distinguished award that will facilitate his research on the history of outer space and twentieth-century astroculture.

Named after the legendary American aviator Charles A. Lindbergh (1902–74), the Chair offers senior scholars with prominent publication records a competitive 12-month fellowship that encourages their book projects in aerospace history, supported by a maximum of US$100,000 towards living expenses.  

Alexander Geppert is the first European and third non-US citizen to win the prestigious award since its inauguration in 1978. For the year 2019–20, while immersed at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, he will be working on a new book project that analyzes global perspectives on outer space.

Shortly after the announcement, The NYU Shanghai Gazette talked to Professor Geppert about the impact the award will have on his current research and The Global Space Age, one of the courses he will teach at NYU Shanghai in the upcoming fall semester before heading to Washington DC next year.

What does this award mean to you on both an academic and personal level?

With more than 7 million visitors per year, the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC is one of the most visited museums in the world. What fewer people know is that it is also a fantastic research institution that comprises three departments: Aeronautics, Earth and Planetary Sciences, and Space History, which will be my “home” there. Its circa 30 curators are not only responsible for organizing top-notch exhibitions but are also deeply engaged in historical research and, in fact, among the world’s leading experts in their fields.

I spent an extremely productive year there in 2014–15 before joining NYU, and I am much looking forward to returning to such a stimulating environment five years later. The Lindbergh Chair is the most advanced fellowship they offer. I am truly excited to take it on, as I love that place as much as I love my research–even if I will certainly miss colleagues, students and friends in Shanghai, New York and Berlin.

Can you describe what your research plans are during your fellowship year at Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum?

By the time I arrive in DC, I hope to have finished the book that I am currently working on, The Future in the Stars: Time and Transcendence in the European Space Age, 1942–1972, and I plan to start with my next project during that year. Tentatively entitled Planetizing Earth: Outer Space and the Making of a Global Age, 1972–1990, it will take the study of outer space to a global level.

Most historical scholarship has focused on the first spacefaring nations, the former USSR, the USA and, to a lesser extent, Europe. But what explains the appeal of astroculture in places such as Congo, China, Egypt, French Guiana and Sri Lanka? At the same time I will be investigating a historical process that I call “planetization,” a term I borrow from French philosopher Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.

In particular after the end of the “classical” Space Age in the early 1970s, outer space has become a technological precondition of present-day globalism—just think of all the communication satellites and invisible infrastructures on which we all depend so much in our globally interconnected lives.

What do you hope students will gain from your upcoming course “The Global Space Age”? How might they understand space exploration or competition in a current context?

I hope that students will learn that outer space has its own history, and that examining this history is necessary to understand what is going on both here on earth and “out there.” While outer space, extraterrestrial life, and global astroculture might at first seem obscure and peripheral, if not entirely exotic topics, we will consider the central role space and spaceflight have played over the course of the twentieth century, both in science and in fiction, and in particular, seen in the second so-called Space Race in Asia of today.

We will cover a broad range of themes, from science fiction, literature and alleged UFO encounters to the history of science, technopolitics and warfare. We will also watch historical space movies, visit Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Qián Xúesēn Museum and meet with experts from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. All my classes are very work- and reading-intense, but I also make sure that we have a lot of fun—serious fun!

 

This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai, you can find the original here.

NYU Shanghai IMA Students Work on Display – Infinite Dimensions

Four selected Interactive Media Arts (IMA) student projects—from an interactive digital fountain to a color-changing constellation—were displayed at the Shanghai MixC Mall in Minhang district as special part of the “INFINITE: Dimensions In Digital Age And Beyond” exhibition on Saturday. This was the first public unveiling of their projects. 

Titled INFINITE·New Born, the exhibition is a collaboration between NYU Shanghai IMA, Shanghai Film, Radio&TV Production and MixC Mall, aiming to facilitate wider public access to works by emerging new media artists. The four IMA students also served as curation and design committee members of the exhibition.

As one of the most influential new media arts exhibitions in Shanghai, “INFINITE: Dimensions In Digital Age And Beyond” hosts a variety of digital and immersive artworks that explore the idea of expansiveness and infinite possibilities, including a visual-sound installation by IMA Resident Research Fellow Cici Liu that depicts the cycle of humans, information, coding, and machine.

“IMA students are challenged to create, as well as to think critically about technology in order to bring meaning and delight to people’s lives,” said Assistant Arts Professor Antonius Wiriadjaja at the opening ceremony. “As an arts professor, there is no greater honor than seeing students put forth their vision into the world.”

The exhibition will conclude on March 22. Here is a glimpse into the students’ featured works and what inspired them:

“Fading Illusion” By Wang Zihe ‘18

Wang Zihe’s artwork is an exploration of generative art and computer music. The visual pattern is based on the analysis of real-time music and aims to show a familiar environment having many possibilities through visual snapshots that are fleeting and one-time. 

“I developed an interest in music at a very young age but never really pursued it. Now, I want to take advantage of my knowledge in computer programming and apply it to music,” Wang said.

“Terrain” By He Fangqing ‘20

He Fangqing’s Terrain aims to explore the possibilities of romantic daydreams brought into the context of daily life, with four scenes: mountains, moon, sunset, and a crystal ball.

“When I was younger, I had a snow globe with a Christmas tree inside, which inspired my current artwork to be both realistic and fictional: realistic in that each scene I recreated was from my childhood memories and yet fictionalized with creativity and imagination,” said He.

“Constellation” By Zhao Nan ‘18

Zhao Nan managed to create an interactive and vivid constellation through the reading of a Bagua graph (the fundamental principles of reality represented through eight Taoist symbols), combined with creative coding.

“I have always been fascinated by the movements of the stars and the Law of Attraction. I thought the 12 zodiacs were not enough and lacked individuality. That’s why my artwork  has an infinite number of constellations, allowing each individual to define themselves.

“The Sound Of Poseidon” By Zhang Chuyi ‘20

The Sound of Poseidon brings sound and water movement together. It is a set of 3D musical fountains that visualize sound and music by changing the color, movement, and oscillation of several particle systems (as water drops). There are six different types of fountains in total, of which different combinations have various visual effects.

“I was inspired by the Dubai Fountain which was visually stunning. However, I also felt it lacked music and interaction, so I programmed a digital fountain that ‘mingled’ with any sound input,” Zhang said.

 

This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai and was written by Huang Shuo ’21. You can find the original here.

Buildings Get Smart with New NYU Shanghai App

“Smart Building,” an interactive, user-friendly facility management platform developed by NYU Shanghai, was launched on January 18 and is expected to serve neighboring properties, including the Diamond Tower and the Fund Building, as part of cooperation with the Lujiazui Group.

Developed by Campus Facilities and IT Services, “Smart Building” uses a WeChat-based data processing system to connect users on mobile terminals with engineers and backstage management staff on the service end.

Under the new system, community members can report and send photos of failed equipment to an online maintenance request that immediately alerts engineers who then provide detailed repair solutions and services. Users can also rate these services on the interface, while managers oversee the smart system operations on the backend.

At the launch ceremony, NYU Shanghai Vice Chancellor Jeffrey Lehman saluted the partnership as an example in experimenting with new approaches in classroom and campus design, university administration, worker relationships and facilities management.

“From the very beginning, the Lujiazui Group understood that NYU Shanghai’s mission is to be an experiment, boldly trying new approaches to being a university. We are delighted to share the Smart Building technology, so that the Lujiazui Group can also benefit from it,” Lehman said.

“Our Smart Building technology ensures that communication is seamless and friendly, while management is data-based and super-efficient. It treats the time and energy of our workers as precious commodities, and it enables us to recognize and celebrate our top performers,” Lehman added.

The launch, moderated by NYU Shanghai Chancellor Yu Lizhong, was also attended by senior leadership of Lujiazui Group, including Chairman Li Jinzhao and General Manager Wang Hui.

Wang Yihua, associate general manager of Lujiazui Logistics, said joint efforts to launch “Smart Building” will stimulate deeper cooperation in technology and management between NYU Shanghai and the Lujiazui Group.

“Our collaboration should take advantage of the Lujiazui Group’s experience and management expertise as an industry leader, and also tap into the intellectual and technological resources of NYU Shanghai.”

This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai and you can read the original here.

Win-Win: Mentors and Mentees at NYU Shanghai

Since 2015, the NYU Alumni Executive Mentorship program has paired dozens of NYU Shanghai students with NYU alumni working in Asia. The program helps students explore professional pathways, while mentors also enjoy the energy and perspectives our students bring. Here, three mentors and their students share their stories, and how it changed their career paths.

There was no doubt in Gabriela Naumnik’s mind.

“She knows what she wants,” laughs Julliet Pan, NYU Tisch ’04, founder of SHE&JUL Films Productions and Media Company, based in New York and Los Angeles. And what Gabriela Naumnik’19, majoring in Interactive Media and Business at NYU Shanghai, wanted in her sophomore year, was to work with Julliet Pan. Mentees choose three possible mentors. Gabriela chose Pan all three times.

When Pan came to Shanghai to meet Naumnik and talk about the internship, she was working on The Lane, a new drama she describes as MelrosePlace-meets-SexintheCity set in Shanghai. She showed Naumnik the trailer. “I love it!” was the immediate reaction.

“I was affected by her enthusiasm,” Pan admits. She asked for Naumnik’s thoughts on lowering the characters’ ages from 23–30 to 18–23, Naumnik’s own demographic and Naumnik agreed. She also suggested making the episodes much shorter—around ten minutes—for an internet audience.

Gabriela’s  enthusiasm re-energized Pan. “I gave her twenty questions to ask expats in Shanghai. She posted the questions on Facebook and began to gather stories.” Naumnik then conducted over forty in-person interviews and brought in other NYU Shanghai students to help.

“I got so much energy from the fearlessness of these students,” says Pan. “They helped me to realize the global appeal of the project.” Pan advises her mentees to “know what they want” and “be honest about their interests with their mentors.” “Through honesty, you gain trust. Gabriela was bold and clear.”

“Pan embodied everything I was interested in,” says Naumnik. “After she told me to follow my heart, I decided to minor in producing. And I have never felt so happy about studying something.” Gabriela’s advice to future mentees? “Choose someone who not only interests you as an industry professional, but also as a person.”

Ambassadors From The “Real World”

Qingchuan (Kyle) Sang ’18 was torn his sophomore year between chemistry and engineering. He wanted to get the inside scoop on the chemical industry. He chose Mark Yang, NYU Courant ’99, General Manager, Spectra Gases (Shanghai), as a possible mentor. “Mark was working on special gases, producing a reactive gas for medical usage.” Yang introduced Kyle to the chemical engineers working on the project. He took Kyle to a business conference in Beijing to meet the company leaders and give Kyle an inside look at decision-making in his industry. Kyle worked as a translator at the conference.  Kyle’s take-away? For now, he feels more comfortable in Research and Development. “I thought the business side would be easier but it’s NOT! Questions like, ‘how big should the factory be; how fireproof do the materials have to be, what should the dirt the factory is built on be composed of’ made me realize that I’m a scientist!”

“I had no mentor experience in my education,” says Mark Yang, “but at my first job at Bell Labs they assigned me a mentor. I still keep in touch with him.” Yang felt that sharing his experience was critical for students considering his field.

“There is a great leap from the academic world to the commercial world. Staying in the lab, he feels, does not give a student in the sciences the whole picture. It really helps to have a mentor prepare you for the culture of the industry and what is expected of you in that culture.”

Culture Counts

Like Mark Yang, Danny Bao, CFA, NYU Stern MBA ’01, Managing Director and Chief Investment Officer, HJY Capital Advisors (HK) Limited, had no mentoring experience in his college years. “In my undergraduate study,  I had very limited career counseling. I had no idea of how the business world worked! Luckily, J.P. Morgan had a mentoring program.” Bao helps his mentees understand their personal strengths. “I try to move the conversation away from what the student’s parents want. I ask about their hobbies and I try to reduce the gap between the parents’ aspirations and the student’s interests.”

“It’s one thing to learn skills,” Bao says, “but these are changing every day with new technologies. Learning the culture of an industry is much harder.” Bao’s mentee, Olivia Taylor ’17, was interested in investment banking, but Bao helped her to realize her true interest in consumer products, and that this was a culture she might enjoy more. “Danny helped me with the interview process, and with an action plan.” Taylor is now in a two-year marketing and development program at L’Oreal. Participants switch roles each year. In her first year, Taylor is working in the luxury division. “For millennials, the culture is so important. The life advice I got from Danny gave me real insight into this. I’ve made friends at L’Oreal—in the end, it’s not just about the resume. It’s about the people you will be working with.”

Article by Susan Salter Reynolds. This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai, you can find the original  here.