NYU Wordpress Theme

NYU Sydney’s Fran Molloy on Australia’s Population Reaching 25 Million Two Decades Earlier than Predicted

AUSTRALIA’S POPULATION HITS 25 MILLION EARLIER THAN EXPECTED

By Fran Molloy, NYU Sydney Lecturer in Journalism

On August 7, Australia’s population reached 25 million, more than two decades faster than predicted.

Recently, the Australian Bureau of Statistics population clock – which adds another Australian every 1 minute and 23 seconds – rolled over to exactly 25 million.

It’s a significant benchmark, particularly when as recently as 2002, Australia’s population was predicted to climb from 19.6 million in 2002, to 25.3 million in 2042.

Instead, Australia’s already at 25 million, more than two decades earlier than expected; and if current trends continue, will likely exceed 30 million by 2030.

“When population grows rapidly, it makes it more likely that you will have further growth in the near future, because you have a younger and more fertile population,” says Professor Nick Parr, from Macquarie’s Centre for Workforce Futures.

He points out that population growth is complex; while migration has played a huge role in for Australia’s fast growth over the last couple of decades, factors like a strong economy pre-2008 and delayed childbearing also contributed to a “baby bump” in the early years of this century.

Students + Kiwis + holiday workers + expats + babies = 25 million

In 2017, net migration accounted for 62 per cent of our population increase. “That number includes international students as well as temporary workers, working holiday makers, New Zealanders and returning expatriates,” says Parr.

With house prices recently spiralling in major cities and complaints of traffic congestion and overdevelopment growing louder, rapid population growth is generally unpopular among Australians.

But there are advantages, Parr says – chief among them that population growth due to immigration both supports our ageing residents – and slows the overall rate of ageing of our population.

“When we have more people working and contributing taxes, the costs of population ageing are spread more widely,” he says.

He says that a more pressing issue for Australia than population growth, is its distribution. “Geographically, our population growth is very heavily concentrated in the major cities, which is the key factor influencing congestion and housing issues.”

What’s next? “Our population will continue to grow, and we need to plan for that as best we can,” he says. “We need to look further into the future to ensure today’s children are educated and trained in areas that would be gainfully used in the labour market, so they help defray the costs of population aging and contribute to tax dollars.”

This article has been republished with the permission of The Lighthouse, Macquarie University’s multimedia news platform.

NYU Abu Dhabi Launches Fikret Science Club to Initiate Conversations on Science in Abu Dhabi

NYU Abu Dhabi’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) is organizing an ongoing series of informal public gatherings through its newly launched Fikret Science Club. Driven towards promoting an understanding of the scientific world to the Abu Dhabi community, the Club will explore various topics under certain themes such as: conservation of cultural heritage through science, biological rhythms and mood, climate change and environmental adaptation, and science in society, among others.

Launching on September 25, 2018, at 7pm, these two-hour long discussions will take place every month at LARTE Restaurant in Manarat Al Saadiyat, Abu Dhabi. Members of the CGSB will lead the monthly gatherings, including the Associate Director of CGSB Operations at NYU Abu Dhabi Enas Qudeimat, and Manager of Administration for the Provost at NYU Abu Dhabi Tiffany Kilfeather. The first talk is entitled A hydrogen atom’s view of ancient mummies and art forgers, and will be led by Assistant Professor of Chemistry at NYU Abu Dhabi Maria Baias.

“The purpose of this Club is to generate interest in science among our students and the wider Abu Dhabi public, as well as introduce participants with an appetite for science to a variety of scientific disciplines to further enhance their knowledge. We’re looking forward to launching this Club, and we hope that the wider Abu Dhabi public will benefit from these interactive sessions and realize the significant role science plays in our everyday lives.”

Associate Director of CGSB Operations at NYU Abu Dhabi Enas Qudeimat

Fikret Science Club is open to both established science enthusiasts and those curious to learn more.

 

This post comes to us from NYU Abu Dhabi. The original can be found here.

NYU Florence Considers – Can Creativity Change the World?

On 24 September, NYU Florence will host a dialogue with Adama Sanneh, Co-Founder and COO of the Moleskin Foundation.

The Moleskine Foundation is a non-profit organization that believes that quality education is key to producing positive change in society and driving our collective future. Focusing on communities affected by cultural and social deprivation, the Foundation is committed to providing youth with unconventional educational tools and experiences that help foster critical thinking, creativity and life-long learning. With a special focus on Africa and its diaspora, the Foundation works closely with local organizations to fund, support and co-create a wide range of distinctive initiatives. Sanneh will present the new strategy of the Foundation and its main initiatives with a specific focus on the role that creativity and art can play in social transformation.

Adama graduated in Linguistic and Cultural Mediation from the University of Milan, he worked for several years in East Africa on rural development and humanitarian emergency programs. He obtained a Master in Public Management (MPM) from the Bocconi School of Management and a Master of Business Administration (MBA) from the University of Geneva. After graduating, he worked as a management and strategy consultant for various public and not-for-profit organizations among which the United Nations, in education, social entrepreneurship and innovation. As Co-Founder and COO of the Moleskine Foundation, he is committed to promoting and advocating a more profound understanding of the African continent, focusing on the role that art and culture can play in social change.

NYU Shanghai Professor Zhang Zheng to Head Amazon’s New AI Lab in Shanghai

NYU Shanghai Professor of Computer Science Zhang Zheng has been appointed Director of Amazon Web Services’ (AWS) newly-opened Shanghai Artificial Intelligence Lab, where he will lead the company’s advanced research and development of deep learning.

AWS made the announcement on September 17 at the 2018 World Artificial Intelligence Conference in Shanghai, shortly after Zhang, a U.S. citizen, became the first foreigner to receive a work permit from the Pudong government allowing him to hold simultaneous positions at Amazon and NYU Shanghai.

An award-winning expert in the theories and practices of large-scale distributed computing and its intersection with machine learning, Zhang held significant positions at Microsoft and Hewlett Packard prior to beginning his career at NYU Shanghai in 2013.

At Amazon, Zhang, who will maintain his appointment at NYU Shanghai but take a leave of absence from his university duties, plans to build a lab that researches natural language processing with a special focus on Chinese. He also hopes to engage and develop an open-source deep learning ecosystem and advise Chinese customers on machine learning and AI adoption.

“I’m honored to join the AWS AI Lab Shanghai, where, together with some of the world’s brightest minds, we will have the opportunity to spur innovation, make technologies easy, fast, and useful for Chinese organization of all sizes,” Zhang said.

“One of the areas I will emphasize is fundamental research via a lab with global culture, and do so in tight collaboration with major universities in Shanghai, including NYU Shanghai,” he added.

Earlier this month, the Exit-Entry Administration of the Pudong Public Security Bureau, as part of its efforts to attract high-end foreign talent, issued Zhang its first-ever work permit allowing foreigners to work part-time in the Shanghai Free Trade Zone. NYU Shanghai Chancellor Yu Lizhong applauded the new policy.

“As a research university, NYU Shanghai encourages its faculty to conduct further research on cutting-edge frontiers and help cultivate global talent,” he said. “The fact that Professor Zhang can now play a key role in the research and development of a leading industry is of great value to the university, enabling us to strengthen our  partnerships with leading companies.”

Professor Zhang is not the first NYU Shanghai community member to take advantage of the government’s efforts to clear hurdles and enable more foreign citizens, particularly innovators and entrepreneurs, to work in Shanghai. Last June, Tyler Rhorick ‘17 became the first international student to obtain a work permit under a new policy allowing foreign graduates of Chinese-accredited universities such as NYU Shanghai to obtain visas to work in Shanghai’s Free Trade Zone. Rhorick now works in NYU Shanghai’s Student Life Office.

Another alumna, Lathika Chandra Mouli ‘17, an Electrical Engineering major, obtained a new “Talent Visa” from the Shanghai Yangpu district that is reserved for recent college graduates employed by startups or Fortune 500 companies. Mouli joined Energo Labs, a blockchain startup, as a project specialist after graduation.

 

This post comes to us from NYU Shanghai. The original can be found here