Dreams and Dreamscapes: The Designers

Elizabeth Bellotti

Madeline DeJong

Madeline Dolgin

Selly Djap

Shayna Feuer

Anna Kathleen

Joy Kim

Lauren and Stephanie Kirshenbaum

Mackenzie Leighton

Victor Leonard

Sophia Merlino

Sanjula Singh

Rachel Wang

Students from Louise Harpman’s “Good Design” Course

Elizabeth Bellotti
Liminal Space – Colors of the Horizon

This collection illustrates the dreamscape present in our daily lives: the horizon. The horizon is a liminal space where the Earth meets the Sky. Symbolically, it represents where our dreams intersect with reality and where the known meets the unknown. Although we see this beautiful and majestic wonder every day, the horizon can evoke a visceral reaction every time it is experienced. I challenged myself with this collection to see if I could create pieces that evoke the same wondrous sensation as watching a sunrise or a sunset. Each dress follows the sun throughout the day, as waves of tulle and silk move the collection from dawn to dusk. The hemlines rise and necklines fall with the sun, until the night envelops the bright yellows and oranges into a deep midnight blue. As the sun sets, the final piece envelops its wearer as the dark of night envelops the sky.

Without forgoing shape or style, these designs seek to reimagine feminine clothing as unrestrictive and empowering. As paint is my primary artistic medium, I have explore silk painting and dip-dying techniques in this collection in attempt to mesh fine art into fashion. Just as no two paintings are alike, I create fashion that is one-of-a-kind, starting from the very fabric I use. In an age of mass production, I am driven to codify clothing once again as an art form.

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Madeline DeJong
Head in the Clouds

This collection explores the concept of dreamscape. The term dreamscape itself means a scene with the strangeness or mysterious characteristic of dreams. When I think of dreaming, I envision myself floating on a cloud. To capture this mystical element, I decided to stick with a color palette of white, gold, silver, and blue. I wanted to create a collection that encapsulates the the element of light and the feeling of floating on a cloud.

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Madeline Dolgin
An Ode to Arizona

After graduating from NYU, my worst nightmare came true: I had to move back to my boring home state of Arizona. I’m being dramatic, of course, but it wasn’t my dream life. Seven months after returning to Arizona, I met a boy who changed my perspective. He started a hiking group that had gained a following of 150 people. I became number 151. I followed him far south to Seven Falls and up north to Humphrey’s Peak. I’ve been following him ever since. Arizona, the boring suburb of my childhood, became a wonderland of beautiful landscapes; of canyons, peaks, rivers, red rocks, boulders, fall trees, and views that took my breath away. I never imagined there was so much beauty in my own backyard. My collection is therefore an ode to you, Arizona; to your dreamscapes, to second chances, and to the boy who led me to places unexplored.

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Selly Djap
Mother

My story starts with a broken family.
I grew up being physically and emotionally abused.
I experienced relational trauma.
Most importantly, I experienced the loss of a caregiver.
And that made me feel like I can never have a healthy relationship around me because I’m too broken beyond repair.
But my dream together with God is that over time He molds me. . .
To become this presence of light for others;
To be this caregiver role for others;
To serve others;
To be there for others who need love and care but don’t have anyone.
Because of what I’ve been through, I understand the burden of feeling like you have to carry the whole world behind your back because you’re on your own.

My collection, Mother, narrates the journey of my own transformation about how God rescued me from my victim mentality. My journey has been a dance with God. And it is a ballet dance that expresses the ideal balance between warmth and control, which is the character of a loving caregiver that He wants to mold into me.

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Shayna Feuer
Oneironaut
An artistic collaboration with music by Cole Feuer

It was almost beautiful
So much of our lives are spent dreaming and we know so little.
Room was strangely dark
Why do we dream? What does it mean? What purpose does it serve?
Eye was almost skeptical of me
Words fail us, our dreams evade us or haunt us inexplicably.
It was so nice having her
Words fail us
She made the room so light and beautiful

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Anna Kathleen
Post-Earth

Earth is an ancient place and spirit being. When it was destroyed by the ancestors, people fled the angered, dying spirit in search of retribution and the cultivation of another terra. Generations later, with the disintegration of earth-made technologies and amenities and after decades of exploration and hardship, a “primitive” culture arises. Upon arriving to Eden, humans struggled to survive and through that struggle, they earned a peace with the spirits of their past and a contentment with their present. The struggle outside forced them to release prejudices and preconceptions within—forced them to give way to the power surrounding them; to learn it and live it, both within and without. The world is beauty; walk in beauty. Walk in harmony and harmonize yourself with dissonance. Any profit, bias, institution, or distinction—of life or death or even of beauty—is only a collective, distant memory. Only this moment of harmony exists, a perfect chord of past and future, all things coexisting, infinitely complex and infinitely brief.

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Joy Kim
The Tangible Ethereal – Transformative Events

The driving force of this project is the sensory imagery of dreams. While we sleep, we are blind to the dimensions of time and we plunge into the ecstasy of deep space. Our mind retrieves fragmented memories to construct an experience lively in sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste. This unity is so rich in our dreams that they induce the same emotions we feel in our waking experience, which allows for these fantastical adventures to be interwoven with our reality. Sometimes a dream experience will be so vivid in memory that it transforms the way we perceive things by redefining their meaning. Like the arts and sciences that study the phenomenon, this project seeks to engage the observer in a sensory experience that evokes the memory of a dream.

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Lauren and Stephanie Kirshenbaum
overcast

When we were thinking about the theme Dreams and Dreamscapes we immediately concluded that dreams are far distant ideas made up in the sky, almost unachievable and out of reach. However, we want to represent that dreams can be attained by bringing them down earth. We expressed this idea through the interaction between clouds to symbolize the sky and dreams with flowers and earthy colors to represent nature and the earth. In our designs, we played with the dichotomy of lighter and flowery fabrics with puffy ones like mesh, tulle, feathers, and other sheer fabrics to find the point of connection between dreams and reality. This collection manifests the idea behind it: our collection began from a simple concept and we turned these visions into reality by getting the chance to create and exhibit our pieces. We hope you enjoy them as much as we do!

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Mackenzie Leighton
“And the Rest” – Original Song

When I think of Dreams and Dreamscapes, I am not drawn to some wonderful open space or distant world. I am pulled into the details of the lives around me, of the slow spin of this leaky world with our strange quirks jumbled up in it. I first moved to Paris in 2017 just after graduating from NYU and wrote the song “And the Rest”, during this time, crafting up stories of the new neighbors that surrounded me. Dreaming up fictions provided me entertainment and comfort as I settled into my new home. Dreaming up a woman down the hall who loses everything, or the man downstairs who paints the spines of books in gold, made the newness strange. I’ve always found comfort in the strange. Now that I actually know some of my neighbors, their quirks are proving to be just as novel as the ones I dreamt up. The woman below my apartment taps her cane on her ceiling when I sing too loud, my landlord on the second floor cooks me green soup, and the student across the courtyard from my window bears witness to the habits in my apartment. The fine line between dream and reality occasionally blurs in Paris.

Spotify
Youtube

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Victor Leonard
Witching Hour

We’ve all had the feeling where it’s 3 am, and you wake up, and you can’t move. When I first experienced this, my mother told me it was “the witch on my back.” This phrase was both beautiful and haunting and has stuck with me since childhood. Inspired by the slow descent into sleep and that terrifying feeling, my collection takes you into that terror and back again.

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Sophia Merlino
Dream Days

Dream Days is inspired by a special mantra of a good friend of mine: “day by day.” This mantra represents the importance of being present. We often live in the land of tomorrows, rushing to get to the next step. In this world, I find it necessary to take a step back and realize that it is the now that is beautiful to be living in. It is common today to have a strong sense of nostalgia and to yearn for the past. Why carry around regrets, or live in the future, when this amazing moment is happening right now? It does not have to be a future or past dreamscape; the present can be the dream. Day by day. Moment by moment. This collection represents our ability to make our fantasies into a reality, through being present in this dream day.

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Sanjula Singh
Amouricana

Growing up as a first-generation American to immigrant parents, there never was a time where I wasn’t aware and appreciative of America’s wonder and beauty. I knew the American dream was real, magical—and unique to this country I love. My collection this year represents the beauty and diversity of America. We are made up of so many beautiful cultures and heritages. Most importantly, this country is made up of the hopes and dreams of its people. My collection is made up of red, white, and blue fabrics from different lands, and pieced together to represent the diversity of the United States. Like patchwork, the textiles of the pieces showcase the combination of cultures and dreams that makes America America.

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Rachel Wang
Dreamt of Flying Bear | 飛熊入夢

The ancient Chinese proverb Dreamt of Flying Bear originated from a story about how a man became the emperor. Days before meeting the adviser who took his family to new heights and glory, he had a dream about a flying bear. This inspirational dream was the spark that ultimately changed the course of Chinese history. Dreaming of the bear is a sign that one is about to meet the most crucial character in one’s history.

Relaxed, loose-fit, but with a hint of queenly ceremony, the collection Dreamt of Flying Bear blends comfort and regality, sleep wear and evening wear. It includes silks, chiffons, and satins for a queen to both dream and govern in. While it is unusual for one to expect to make big changes to history while dreaming, it is often the catalyst that could lead to seismic shifts. While dreaming about conquest and lofty aspirations, it is also important to dream of whimsy and to look out for the little signs. Dream of flying bears.

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Students from Louise Harpman’s “Good Design” Course
The White T-Shirt Project

Students engage a design at many scales throughout the semester of Good Design, an interdisciplinary seminar taught by Louise Harpman. One project, entitled “Whiteness”, asks each student to offer her own body and clothing to become a site of investigation. For this short exercise, the class considers a range of cultural meanings ascribed to the color white as we engage seminal texts in anthropology, economics, history, and cultural criticism.

Throughout the design project, each student is asked to select a plain white t-shirt and transform it to demonstrate a particular design principle or, as often, to offer a counternarrative. Students are limited to a prescribed set of procedures they can use in their work. No color or additional material may be introduced. Final designs are modeled in class and also presented as studio-quality photographs. During the project, directed readings and discussions challenge students to develop their design faculties, but also to probe the cultural conditions of whiteness and how race is constructed.

Audrey Burt
Imbalance

This shirt was inspired by imbalance through displacement. Rather than complete removal of material, my aim was to emphasize the neckline and sleeves that give a t-shirt its “t-shirt-ness” through the absence of fabric for one half of the garment, while exaggerating and elongating the other side through the relocation of that same material. It was important to me to transform the shirt in a way which neither adds nor subtracts from the given object, but to reconstruct the garment while still retaining some of the classic design.

Paloma Baille
Diagonal

The word “diagonal” is represented in my t-shirt design. I challenged myself to create clean, crisp diagonal lines using a material that is usually soft and which easily forms to the body. I cut the woven jersey into a series of wide strips, then hardened them with starch. The hardened strips were reassembled to create a strong, stiff, and dramatic look.

Erina Chavez
Linear

This shirt was designed with linearity and whiteness in mind. By re-seaming the sides and shoulders, its “T”-ness could be exaggerated.

Olivia Saber
Repetition

This shirt takes the familiar plain white t-shirt and transforms it to represent the design principle of “repetition.” While keeping a classic and recognizable form, negative space and reallocation of fabric reiterates clear lines and expected silhouettes.

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