Tag Archives: Labor

Hosea Hudson

Hosea Hudson (1898-1988) was an African-American labor leader, industrial union organizer, activist and a member of the Communist Party of the United States. His early adult years were spent working as a sharecropper in Georgia and eventually as an iron molder in Alabama. He spent a few months in New York studying at a Communist Party training school where he learned to read in write. Hudson remained in the party up until his death in 1988.

This interview was conducted on November 15th & 16th, 1986.

Marge Frantz

Marge Frantz (1922-2015) was a teacher, feminist and activist. Her father, Joe Gelder, joined the Communist Party during the Great Depression as a way to organize for labor rights in the South. She became a member of the Young Communist League when she was 13 years old. She married Laurent Frantz in 1941, who was a lawyer and a member of the Communist Party. She later went on to meet her life partner, Eleanor Engstrand, during her work for UC Berkeley’s Institute of Industrial Relations. She left the CP in 1956, but was an active member up until that point.

This interview was conducted on February 6th, 1987.

Rob Hall

Rob Hall (1906-1993) was an author, editor and publisher. During the Great Depression, he sought an alternative to capitalism, and joined the Communist Party. Hall edited one of the party’s student publications, The Student Review. After his graduation from Columbia University, Hall worked for The Daily Worker. Hall left the publication in 1956 after 11 years of employment due to his disagreements regarding the Stalin regime. In his later years, he focused his efforts on environmental preservation and became the editor of The Conservationist.

This interview was conducted on September 18th and 19th, 1987.

Nannie Washburn

Nannie Washburn (1900-) was a civil rights activist, an advocate for internationalism and a Communist Party member who was born into a sharecropper’s family in Georgia. She spent her childhood working in the textile industry starting at the age of eight. She joined the Communist Party in the 1930s during the Great Depression. She spent the majority of her life fighting for equal rights for African-Americans, claiming that “I won’t be free until all of us are free.”