Why it’s good for bipartisanship when politicians publicly ignore and reject their own party’s base

Politicians must often walk a fine line with their rhetoric in order to avoid offending important groups – and this need is no different where the “base” of their party is concerned. John V. Kane has previously found that when a politician actually works to upset their base, this can lead to more support from those in the opposing party, which could lead to more bipartisanship. In new research, he determines that partisans are attracted to stories about an opposing-party president antagonizing their base, revealing another way that the media are important in forming political opinions.

Should there be a 5th World Conference on Women in 2020?

Anne Marie Goetz Clinical Professor, Center for Global Affairs, School of Professional Studies, New York University.  She has written on gender mainstreaming, gender and conflict, and on gender in UN policies (including the UN’s World Conferences on Women). A range

THE NEW ICC CRIME OF AGGRESSION COULD MAKE LEADERS THINK TWICE IF THEY ARE CONSIDERING INVADING

According to Jennifer Trahan, a Clinical Professor at the NYU Center for Global Affairs, the activation of the crime of aggression, despite its apparent limitations, could provide some deterrent against leaders who may be tempted to invade another country.