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Category Archives: Tamiment Library & Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives

Joe Doherty Corner: The Troubles in America

In 1990, the New York City Council renamed the intersection of Pearl and Park South Streets in Lower Manhattan “Joseph Doherty Corner.” Typically streets are renamed to honor the deceased and to acknowledge a significant connection or contribution to the local community. Joseph Doherty Corner,

Archival Management for Serials Collections

Today’s entry is written by Maggie Schreiner, adjunct archivist at the Tamiment Library and Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives. The Tamiment Library recently acquired a newspaper and pamphlet collection, consisting of over 350 individual titles. The materials were collected by the Freedom Socialist Party and

The Devil in the Archives

There is a box in the Tamiment stacks bearing an ominous mark: “Lucifer.” The box itself is dirty, and at first glance looks like it could have been burned. In general, the presence of fire is frowned upon in the archives, let alone the lakes

On Photography Backlogs

If you’ve been in Tamiment within the past year or so and taken a peek into our conference room, you may have wondered, “What is the deal with all of the Post-its?” All will be revealed to you now… We are pleased to announce the

May Day around the Cold War World

Today’s entry is written by Sarah Moazeni, a Graduate Reference Assistant working in the Tamiment Library and Wagner Labor Archives. On May 1 1886, thousands of workers across America demonstrated and organized strikes to force employers to agree to an eight hour work day. Workers

Preservation Week 2014: Tape Troubles and Treatments

Today’s post was written by Claire Kenny, Assistant Research Scholar in the Barbara Goldsmith Book and Paper Conservation Laboratory. As a paper conservator I spend a lot of time removing tape. The use of tape is ubiquitous; it is a fast, easy way to mend

The Archive Speaks: Howard Zinn and the Spelman Dismissal

Today’s entry is written by Alexsandra Mitchell, an adjunct librarian working in the Tamiment Library and Wagner Labor Archives. Radical thinker, activist, historian, playwright, author, and teacher—these are just a few of the titles given to scholar Howard Zinn. Zinn, who dedicated his life and

Union Poetry in the Gilded Age

The Gilded Age in America (approximately 1870-1900) was a time of great growth for organized labor. With this growth came the publication of union newspapers and magazines, and with the publications came poetry. Union magazines offered a sort of portable communal meeting place for workers

Tamiment/Wagner Button Collection Rehousing Project

Today’s entry is written by Ariana Dunning, a graduate student in Museum Studies at New York University, working in the Barbara Goldsmith Preservation and Conservation Department. The Tamiment Library and Wagner Labor Archive holds an extensive collection of political, labor, and protest buttons that have