NYU COUNSELING, WELLNESS, & TITLE IX SUPPORT SERVICES

NYU Washington, DC students can schedule appointments with Global Wellness Counselor Gaby Grebski by email at gaby.grebski@nyu.edu and she will respond as soon as she can.  If any NYU Washington, DC need to speak with an NYU Wellness Counselor immediately and Gaby is not available, they can chat confidentially with an Wellness Counselor by downloading the NYU Wellness mobile app or contacting the NYU Wellness Exchange at (212) 443-9999.   Anyone can also privately report wellness concerns to an NYU Washington, DC staff member by contacting the NYU Washington, DC emergency phone.

Additionally, the NYU Center for Sexual Misconduct and Support Services can provide confidential assistance to complainants about sexual misconduct, relationship violence, and stalking.  Support includes providing information about resources and options, accompanying a complainant to rape treatment centers, medical services, and campus proceedings.  Learn about NYU’s Title IX Policy.

The NYU Health Promotion office also has a range of health and wellness resources available to NYU students, regardless of where you are studying each semester.


ADDITIONAL WELLNESS RESOURCES

NOTE:  NYU Wellness does not monitor or endorse any non-NYU resources listed below, so please always read critically!  If you have questions or concerns about your own unique situation, please schedule an appointment with Sarah or contact the Wellness Exchange.


24/7 EMERGENCY / CRISIS RESPONSE

EMS | 911
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline | 1 (800) 273-8255
The Trevor Project Lifeline | (866) 488-7386


ABUSE / VIOLENCE IN RELATIONSHIPS

Center for Relationship Abuse Awareness
Warning Signs: National Domestic Abuse Hotline


ALCOHOL & DRUG USE / ABUSE / MISUSE

Addiction Blog
Alcoholics Anonymous: Washington Area Intergroup Association | (202) 966 9115
Blood Alcohol Content Calculator
Detox | (877) 386 4191
Drug Abuse Treatment Center | (877) 714 0596
Drug Rehab Locator
Inpatient Drug Rehab | (877) 684 1124
Narcotics Anonymous: Chesapeake and Potomac Region | (800) 543 4670
National Institute of Drug Abuse
Rethinking Drinking


ANXIETY & PANIC

Coping with Anxiety Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress
NIMH: Overview of Anxiety Disorders
Tips to Coping with Panic Attacks


DEPRESSION

Is it Depression or the Blues?
Mayo Clinic: Seasonal Affective Disorder
NIMH: Overview of Depression
Women and Depression


EATING CONCERNS & BALANCED NUTRITION

Eat Well, Be Well
Eating Well While at NYU Washington, DC
National Eating Disorders Association


EMOTION REGULATION & DISTRESS TOLERANCE

50 Ways to Take a Break Poster
Coping Skills Pros and Cons
Distress Coping Skills List
Stress Relief Activities


MINDFULNESS

Calm Meditation Site/App | Free for NYU students
Free Guided Meditations
KORU: Evidence-Based Meditation & Mindfulness for College-Aged Adults
Meditation 101: A Beginner’s Guide Animation
MindfulNYU: Resources and Media
UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center
Weekly Meditation Class in DC


PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Balance Gym
Bike Share at NYUDC
Flow Yoga
The Studio (Yoga)
Joy of Motion Dance Center
Kayak/Stand-Up Paddleboarding
T’ai Chi


RELATIONSHIPS

Conflict Management Styles Assessment
Healthy Relationships
Love Languages Personal Profile Assessment
Online Dating Safety Tips
Social Anxiety Support
The Ultimate Guide to LGBTQ Dating Safety
Tips for Building Strong Relationships
Social Anxiety Support


SEXUAL ORIENTATION & GENDER IDENTITY

Coming Out
DC Center for the LGBT Community
Gender Identity
LGBTQ Advocacy on College Campuses
NYU LGBTQSC
Trans Lifeline | (877) 565 8860
Transgender FAQ


SLEEP

Harvard’s 12 Sleep Tips
The Better Sleep Council


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What is the difference between a counselor, a psychologist and a psychiatrist?

Counselors often attend graduate school in social work and are trained to perform psychotherapy; psychologists attend graduate school in psychology and often focus on human behavior; and psychiatrists attend medical school and often focus on the biological aspects of mental illness.  Learn more here.

What types of issues to students seek counseling to address?

Students seek counseling for a variety of reasons including: adjustment to new place, feeling homesick, depression, anxiety, alcohol & drug concerns, sexuality, sexual assault, eating disorders, body image concerns, relationships, to explore social identities, academic stress, concern about a friend, self-injury, to process loss of a loved one, suicidal thoughts, to explore themselves, to set goals, to stay motivated.  Counseling is a confidential space in which to discuss your personal concerns and to receive support and help.

What if I prefer to see a mental health provider off-campus?

No problem at all.  Not everyone feels comfortable seeking counseling on campus, and sometimes providers with certain specialties are a better fit for your needs.  You can meet with the onsite wellness counselor for help finding off-campus referrals, you can look for off-campus providers yourself through your insurance provider, or you can call the wellness exchange at (212) 443-9999 for assistance with referrals.  If you are able to pay out of pocket for fees you will have access to a broader range of providers available to you.  There are several excellent psychotherapists and psychiatrists in the Washington DC area.

What signs should I look for if I’m concerned about a friend’s mental health?

Please read this overview from the Jed Foundation.