Some of you may know that I will be stepping down from the deanship in a very few weeks. I have served as dean of Liberal Studies for 13 years, and during that time, we have seen the program grow in new and important ways.

The Liberal Studies offices moved to Broadway in 2004.

The major milestones are clearly visible: enrollment in the program has nearly doubled; we have added remarkable first-year away programs in London, Paris, and Washington, DC, joining our pioneering first-year program in Florence; and we created our four-year baccalaureate degree, Global Liberal Studies, among whose 2017 graduates are a Rhodes Scholar, a Gilman Fellow, a Princeton in Africa Fellow, and a Humanity in Action Fellow. No fewer than five LS alums have been named to Forbes “30 Under 30” lists in recent years. Our graduates are starting careers in fields as diverse as finance, global NGOs, media, and technology; they are embarking on graduate and professional study at leading U.S. and international universities.

Less immediately visible, but no less important, we have greatly improved our financial aid to students. Over the past decade we have raised more than $25,000,000 in gifts, virtually all to support scholarships. As the University prioritizes affordability, we are providing more scholarship aid for global study and for first-generation students.

Most important of all for me, I’ve been privileged to meet thousands of well-prepared, bright, and dynamic students, students from every part of the U.S. and across the globe. I have been fortunate to help provide our students with great opportunities to achieve their ambitious goals. I look forward now to continuing to work with our students in my new role as a full-time faculty member teaching in the Liberal Studies Core Program.

In serving this great program, I have been fortunate to work with and to get to know well many talented and dedicated staff and faculty colleagues. I take one final opportunity to thank them for all that they do to support our students.

Finally, I’m delighted to introduce the next dean of Liberal Studies, Professor Julie Mostov. Dean Mostov comes to us from Drexel University, where she served as Senior Vice Provost for Global Initiatives, and where she virtually single-handedly created Drexel’s international programs. The leadership of Liberal Studies is now in her capable hands.

London is a very special place to me – it is where I did my graduate work, where I first taught, and at times where I have lived. But I am here this week because it is the gathering place for dozens of Liberal Studies faculty who lead our writing-intensive courses.

Each of these faculty members teaches Liberal Studies classes at one of NYU’s global academic centers in cities around the world. We have convened from New York and Madrid, from Buenos Aires and Shanghai, and from Berlin and Florence, to exchange innovative ideas and best practices. Our focus is the unique curriculum that is foundational to Liberal Studies learning.
Another core component of Liberal Studies is global study, integrated seamlessly into the education of our students. As in this week’s conference, we foster frequent pedagogical connections among our faculty who are positioned throughout NYU’s global network so that our students develop the same essential skills and achieve the same learning outcomes no matter where in the global network they study.

Below are a few photos from our conference:
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Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Robert Squillace, who has studied how education technology can connect learning communities, shares insight.
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Master teacher and award-winning author Roberta Newman addresses the group.