What do the following have in common: A literary festival in Trinidad and Tobago, an editorial board of the American Library Association, a foundation that supports emerging artistic talent, and a writer-in-residency program in Berlin?

All are organizations that have recently recognized Liberal Studies faculty for their scholarship and creative work.

And last night, we honored them at NYU. The annual Faculty Honors Reception salutes NYU faculty who have received prestigious awards and special recognition in 2016. Among the honorees were four LS professors who are also distinguished authors:

  • Jacqueline Bishop – Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature, One Caribbean Media
  • Miriam Frank – Outstanding Academic Titles, American Library Association
  • Mitchell Jackson – Whiting Award for Fiction, Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation
  • Lina Meruane – Otra Mirada Prize, 15th Annual Premio Calamo; Artist-in-Residency, DAAD Berlin

Their work ranges from fiction to nonfiction, from Spanish to English, and from creative to research-based, but their scholarly and creative contributions stand out as among the best in the world. I was proud to acknowledge their work at the Faculty Honors Reception. I am equally proud of the talents they bring to the classroom and share with LS students every day.

London is a very special place to me – it is where I did my graduate work, where I first taught, and at times where I have lived. But I am here this week because it is the gathering place for dozens of Liberal Studies faculty who lead our writing-intensive courses.

Each of these faculty members teaches Liberal Studies classes at one of NYU’s global academic centers in cities around the world. We have convened from New York and Madrid, from Buenos Aires and Shanghai, and from Berlin and Florence, to exchange innovative ideas and best practices. Our focus is the unique curriculum that is foundational to Liberal Studies learning.
Another core component of Liberal Studies is global study, integrated seamlessly into the education of our students. As in this week’s conference, we foster frequent pedagogical connections among our faculty who are positioned throughout NYU’s global network so that our students develop the same essential skills and achieve the same learning outcomes no matter where in the global network they study.

Below are a few photos from our conference:
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Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Robert Squillace, who has studied how education technology can connect learning communities, shares insight.
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Master teacher and award-winning author Roberta Newman addresses the group.