All Things Bakelite at Dibner Library (Brooklyn)

Plastic rods in the background and "All Things Bakelite The Age of Plastic" written in the foreground.

A new display in Dibner Library features Bakelite, the first synthetic plastic and its inventor, Leo Hendrik Baekeland. A Belgian chemist, Baekeland immigrated to the United States in 1889 to do chemical research on photographic paper and eventually patented his new paper under the name ‘Velox’. In 1907, he filed a patent for  oxybenzylmethylenglycolanhydride, later called Bakelite, a synthetic thermosetting plastic that could be molded and then cured by applying heat and pressure using a Bakelizer machine.

Bakelite was used for a wide range of products from clocks and radios to billiard balls and gears – all of which can be seen in the display. Bakelite jewelry is still popular among collectors, impressive for its resistance to chemicals and wear. The jewelry on display is actually contemporary work made using vintage phenolic rods by the local artist Jorge Caicedo – which just goes to show how remarkable Bakelite is in terms of durability. During its heyday, Bakelite was hailed as the “material of a thousand uses” and advertisements focused on its variety of applications in all sectors of production. Since Bakelite was an excellent electrical insulator, it became widely used in industrial settings and cars, so much so that their modern counterparts are still being used to this day! A variety of these automotive parts and industrial tools are also in the display.

The display will be up in the atrium of Dibner Library until July 1st, but you can always find more information about Baekeland and Bakelite at allthingsbakelite.com! Keep an eye out for a screening of the documentary “All Things Bakelite” on PBS, coming soon.

The Bakelite display was curated by dual-degree student Zoe Blecher-Cohen (Poly Archives Graduate Assistant) and Lindsay Anderberg (Poly Archivist) with help from donor Hugh Karraker (All Things Bakelite producer).

EXHIBITION | 1923: Public Domain in the University Archive

The New York University Archives is pleased to announce the opening of its latest exhibition.

1923: Public Domain in the University Archive

Graphic of public domain mark 1923

The Tamiment Library & Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives
Reading Room, Bobst Library
Now – May 22, 2019
Free and open to the public* during reading room hours.

Prepared by ARL/SAA Mosaic Fellow, Jasmine Sykes-Kunk, with assistance from graduate student, Lingyu Wang, features materials from collections held at the New York University Archives.

To commemorate the first release of works into the public domain since 1998, this exhibition examines works in the collection that recently moved into the public domain and their relationship to the greater University community.

The exhibition features an interactive component and users are encouraged to share their “remixes” using the hashtag, #NYUpublicdomain.

To learn more about copyright laws check out the Copyright Research Guide created by NYU’s Scholarly Communication Librarian, April Hathcock. 

Plan Your Visit

This exhibition is open to the public during Reading Room hours.

*Non-NYU visitors, please go to the Library Privileges window in Bobst Lobby to get a visitor pass. The last passes are issued 30 minutes before the reading room closes. 


THE TAMIMENT LIBRARY & ROBERT F. WAGNER LABOR ARCHIVES READING ROOM
Bobst Library, 10th Floor
70 Washington Square South | New York | NY | 10012

 

Closing Event – Oct. 9 | The Unflinching Eye: The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz

Panel Discussion & Reception:
Tuesday, October 9th, 6:30-8:30 PM

Bobst Library, 3rd Floor, 70 Washington Square South

The summer of 2018 offered a slew of exhibitions, programs, new publications, and criticism surrounding the work of David Wojnarowicz. The Whitney Museum’s retrospective, History Keeps Me Awake at Night, was the epicenter of activities, with several concurrent exhibitions elsewhere, including PPOW Gallery’s Soon All This Will Be Picturesque Ruins: The Installations of David Wojnarowicz and NYU’s The Unflinching Eye: The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz.

Photo: David Wojnarowicz work depicting sculpture of open eye with ant crawling on the eyeball.
Untitled (eye with ant), 1988. Silver gelatin print courtesy of PPOW Gallery.

To mark the closing of The Unflinching Eye, NYU’s Nicholas Martin welcomes Whitney curator David Kiehl, PPOW Co-founder Wendy Olsoff, and NYU Contributing Curator Hugh Ryan for a reflection on these disparate exhibitions, how they complement and contrast with one another, and how the events of this summer reflect and build upon Wojnarowicz’s legacy here in New York and the world over.

Panel discussion 6:30-8:00. Reception to follow.  R.S.V.P


EXHIBITION
The Unflinching Eye:
The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz

Now through October 11th, 2018
Free and open daily to the public until 11 pm

THE MAMDOUHA BOBST GALLERY
70 Washington Square South | New York | NY | 10012

NYU is grateful to the Keith Haring Foundation for its support of The Unflinching Eye.


 

Exhibition | The Unflinching Eye: The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz

The Unflinching Eye:
The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz

Mamdouha Bobst Gallery |  July 12th – October 11, 2018 (Extended)

Free and open daily to the public until 11 pm

Photo: David Wojnarowicz work depicting sculpture of open eye with ant crawling on the eyeball.
Untitled (eye with ant), 1988. Silver gelatin print courtesy of PPOW Gallery.

The Unflinching Eye utilizes archival material to contextualize Wojnarowicz’s creative practice. Selected almost entirely from the David Wojnarowicz Papers, housed in NYU’s Fales Library, the exhibition seeks to analyze the images, ideas, and relationships that informed the artist’s work across media including painting, photography, installation, performance, and writing.


Opening Reception: Thursday, July 12, 2018, 6PM-8PM


NYU is grateful to the Keith Haring Foundation for its support of The Unflinching Eye.

THE MAMDOUHA BOBST GALLERY
70 Washington Square South | New York | NY | 10012