Spring 2015 Workshops in Digital Humanities for NYU Graduate Students

Polonsky Foundation Graduate Student Workshops in Digital Humanities: Tools and Methods

The 2015 Polonsky Foundation Graduate Student Workshops in Digital Humanities offer NYU graduate students an intensive introduction to tools and methods for digital scholarship through day-long, hands-on sessions with experts in the field. Workshops will explore diverse approaches to research ranging from text markup and analysis to data visualization and mapping.

You must register to attend. All workshops will be held in Bobst Library.

Follow the links below for more information and to register.

Bibliographic Metadata for Digital Humanists, April 3rd, 9:30-4
This workshop will introduce methods for extracting metadata from different types of online catalogs and will include a brief overview of Machine-Readable Cataloging (MARC), the chief format for bibliographic information.

Geospatial Analysis and the Digital Humanities: Principles, Tools, and Process, April 10th, 9:30-4
Digital humanists often incorporate Geographic Information Systems (GIS)  into the process of interpreting texts and culture. This workshop will explore some of these methods as we integrate several data sets into GIS software and mapping platforms designed for digital humanities inquiry.

Copyright Issues for Digital Humanists, April 17th, 2-5pm
This workshop will start with an overview of general copyright issues, and then delve into specific issues and practical applications of copyright law in digital humanities.

DH101, May 27th, 9:30-4
Many DH projects rely on a core set of skills: finding, cleaning, and organizing data; asking meaningful questions of that data; and visualizing it. In this workshop, we’ll work together on one set of sources, going from zero to DH project over the course of a day.

DH DevOps: Core Skills and Foundations, May 29th, 9:30-4
Building on the DH101 workshop, we will cover the foundations of critical computing in the humanities.

Introduction to TEI, June 2nd, 9:30-4
This session will teach the basics of coding in XML (eXtensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines.

Large Scale Text Analysis with R, June 3rd, 9:30-4
In this workshop, we will explore the different methods through which text mining can be used to “read” text in new ways.

Introduction to Project Development, June 8th, 9:30-4
This workshop will explore the fundamentals of project planning and design.

Content, Curation, and Publication: Using WordPress and Omeka to Tell Scholarly Stories, June 10th, 9:30-4
This workshop will explore how the platforms WordPress and Omeka can help scholars publish their work by creating dynamic digital publications and exhibitions.

HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities

HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities

Thursday January 15, 5:00- 6:30, reception to follow; books available for sale.

Jurow Lecture Hall at New York University Silver Center, Room 101, 100 Washington Square East (entrance on Washington Place)

Todd Presner discusses his collaboratively authored new book, co-edited with David Shepard and Yoh Kawano, a metaLAB project from Harvard University Press, and tours its companion website http://www.hypercities.com/. Todd Presner is Sady and Ludwig Kahn Director of the Center for Jewish Studies, Professor of Germanic Languages and Comparative Literature, and Chair of the Digital Humanities Program at the University of California, Los Angeles.

In conversation with:

Matthew K. GoldAssociate Professor of English and Digital Humanities, Graduate Center, CUNY; Director of the CUNY Academic Commons and Editor of Debates in the Digital Humanities (University of Minnesota Press, 2012)

Laura Kurgan, Associate Professor of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, and Director of the Spatial Information Design Lab at Columbia University, and author of Close Up, at a Distance: Mapping, Technology, Politics (Zone Books, the MIT Press, 2013)

Introduced by Thomas Augst, Associate Professor of English and Acting Director of Digital Humanities, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, New York University

Part of the metaLAB series of books about the digital humanities, HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities (2014) is a collaboratively authored and designed exploration of mapping cities over time. The primary authors are Todd Presner, David Shepard, and Yoh Kawano, with contributions by Philip Ethington, Mike Blockstein, Reanne Estrada, Chris Johanson, Diane Favro, and Xarene Eskandar. A digital platform transmogrified into a book, it profiles the ambitious online project of the same name that maps the historical layers of city spaces in an interactive, hypermedia environment. The authors examine the media archaeology of Google Earth and the cultural–historical meaning of map projections, and explore recent events—the “Arab Spring” and the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster—through social media mapping that incorporates data visualizations, photographic documents, and Twitter streams. HyperCities includes a “ghost map” of downtown Los Angeles, polyvocal memory maps of LA’s historic Filipinotown, avatar-based explorations of ancient Rome, and hour-by-hour mappings of the 2009 Tehran election protests.

This in an NYC-DH event, sponsored by NYU Libraries, in partnership with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of New York University.

Text Analytics for Social Data Using DiscoverText & Sifter, November 11, 2014

Join Data Services for a one-hour guest lecture by Dr. Stuart Shulman on using the DiscoverText and Sifter tools to analyze social media data. These tools can be used to sift data from Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr and other platforms, and to use machine learning and human coding to understand data from these sources.