Redesigned AWDL site launched

We are pleased to announce the launch of the redesigned Ancient World Digital Library (AWDL). An initiative of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW), AWDL will identify, collect, curate, and provide access to a broad range of scholarly materials relevant to the study of the ancient world. This site redesign, featuring all new scholarly content, was over a year in the making, involving a deep dive into book metadata and book publishing as well as an overhaul in site functionality. A special thanks to Alberto, Carol, Joe, Kate, Laura, Melitte, and Rasan for their work on this project.

Camp Kinderland collection is live

Camp Kinderland was founded on Sylvan Lake in Hopewell Junction, NY in 1923 by members of the Workmen’s Circle who worked in the organization’s New York City schools. The camp’s founders sought to create a summer youth camp that would not only provide a recreational escape for the children of working people from the tenements of New York City, but also one whose culture would encourage and foster a commitment to socially progressive activism and the embracing of a rich Jewish secular tradition. DLTS digitized the photographic materials for this collection, which were glass negatives. The digitization process was complex and interesting, and the results are beautiful.

Bibliographic Metadata Lecture and Workshop Wrap-up

Last week, NYU Libraries hosted Molly O’Hagan Hardy, Digital Humanities Curator at the American Antiquarian Society. After giving a public lecture discussing some of the theoretical aspects of using bibliographic metadata in digital humanities projects, Hardy led a workshop the following day that taught graduate students some of the skills and methods for utilizing bibliographic metadata in their own research. The events marked a successful beginning to the Polonsky Foundation Graduate Student Workshops in Digital Humanities: Tools and Methods series, which is supported by a grant to the Graduate School of Arts and Science by the Polonsky Foundation.

Spring 2015 Public Lectures in Digital Humanities

Polonsky Foundation Public Lectures in Digital Humanities

These events are open to the public; registration is not required. All workshops will be held in Bobst Library’s Avery Fisher Center. Attendees without an NYU ID card should enter at the guard’s desk in the library’s atrium.

Follow the links below for more information.

Molly O’Hagan Hardy: The Presence of the Past April 2nd, 5-6:30pm
With examples from the eighteenth-century transatlantic book trade as represented in library catalogs and content databases, Molly O’Hagan Hardy will examine time’s traces in the archives and how such traces can be re-conceived or eclipsed in digital humanities projects.

Miriam Posner: Head-and-Shoulder-Hunting in the Americas May 28th, 1-2:30pm
Between 1936 and 1967, Walter Freeman, a prominent neurologist, lobotomized as many as 3,500 Americans. In this presentation, Miriam Posner will detail her efforts to understand why Freeman was so devoted to this practice, using computer-assisted image-mining and -analysis techniques.

Mark Algee-Hewitt June 4th, 1-2:30pm
This talk explores the meaning behind the practical aspects of Digital Humanities analyses and probes the delicate balance we maintain as we apply the critical methodologies of the humanities to the algorithmically derived, statistically significant data that lies behind our results.

Jennifer Giuliano: Humanities Infrastructure versus the Digital Humanities June 9th, 1-2:30pm
This lecture will explore the ways in which digital humanities and its associated research projects have challenged the often-overlapping, but frequently problematic, technical and social architectures of the academy.