Get Set for a Great Finish!

NYU Libraries has a host of resources to help you sprint through finals.

Check out the listings of what’s happening at Bobst and Dibner.

A running track painted with white lines and "1500 P" mark in the foreground. The track stretching into the distance. Image from a viewpoint close to the ground.

BOBST LIBRARY

Study all night starting Friday 12/14

We’re keeping the Bobst stacks open 24-hours for NYU students.

Making more space

We’ve suspended our guest policy this week to maximize space for you!

Perk up!

Beginning Mon. 12/17 free coffee is available during the overnight hours in Bobst on LL1.

Stretch & RelaxWomen in a seated yoga pose with hands in prayer position over her head.

Sign up for a yoga and mini meditation session

Mon. 12/17 – 2:00pm
Mon. 12/17 – 2:30pm
Tues. 12/18 – 3:00pm
Tues. 12/18 – 3:30pm

Get in the zone

Complimentary earplugs are available at the Circulation & Reserves Service desk in the atrium.


DIBNER LIBRARY

Extended hours starting Friday 12/14

Dibner will be open 24-hours and not closing again until Fri. 12/21 at 6pm.

Snacks & Treats

Cup of black coffee in white mug sitting on a yellow surface, photographed from above.

Overnight snacks at midnight in LC433 provided by Student Affairs on Mon. 12/17, Tues. 12/18, and Weds. 12/19

We’ve got coffee available for overnight studying

Popcorn will be distributed (while supplies last) starting Sun. 12/16 in the late evening.

De-stress and get in the zone

The library will be handing out security reminders and tips for studying and de-stressing.

Earplugs are available from the service desk to help block out distractions.

Visit the De-stress Zone (across from the service desk)
We’ve got activities for your study breaks:

  • games (chess, battleship, etc.)
  • jigsaw puzzles
  • origami
  • coloring sheets
  • de-stress balls
  • spin chair

Closing Event – Oct. 9 | The Unflinching Eye: The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz

Panel Discussion & Reception:
Tuesday, October 9th, 6:30-8:30 PM

Bobst Library, 3rd Floor, 70 Washington Square South

The summer of 2018 offered a slew of exhibitions, programs, new publications, and criticism surrounding the work of David Wojnarowicz. The Whitney Museum’s retrospective, History Keeps Me Awake at Night, was the epicenter of activities, with several concurrent exhibitions elsewhere, including PPOW Gallery’s Soon All This Will Be Picturesque Ruins: The Installations of David Wojnarowicz and NYU’s The Unflinching Eye: The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz.

Photo: David Wojnarowicz work depicting sculpture of open eye with ant crawling on the eyeball.
Untitled (eye with ant), 1988. Silver gelatin print courtesy of PPOW Gallery.

To mark the closing of The Unflinching Eye, NYU’s Nicholas Martin welcomes Whitney curator David Kiehl, PPOW Co-founder Wendy Olsoff, and NYU Contributing Curator Hugh Ryan for a reflection on these disparate exhibitions, how they complement and contrast with one another, and how the events of this summer reflect and build upon Wojnarowicz’s legacy here in New York and the world over.

Panel discussion 6:30-8:00. Reception to follow.  R.S.V.P


EXHIBITION
The Unflinching Eye:
The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz

Now through October 11th, 2018
Free and open daily to the public until 11 pm

THE MAMDOUHA BOBST GALLERY
70 Washington Square South | New York | NY | 10012

NYU is grateful to the Keith Haring Foundation for its support of The Unflinching Eye.


 

Call for Submissions – 2018 Bobst Film Festival

 

Exhibition | The Unflinching Eye: The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz

The Unflinching Eye:
The Symbols of David Wojnarowicz

Mamdouha Bobst Gallery |  July 12th – October 11, 2018 (Extended)

Free and open daily to the public until 11 pm

Photo: David Wojnarowicz work depicting sculpture of open eye with ant crawling on the eyeball.
Untitled (eye with ant), 1988. Silver gelatin print courtesy of PPOW Gallery.

The Unflinching Eye utilizes archival material to contextualize Wojnarowicz’s creative practice. Selected almost entirely from the David Wojnarowicz Papers, housed in NYU’s Fales Library, the exhibition seeks to analyze the images, ideas, and relationships that informed the artist’s work across media including painting, photography, installation, performance, and writing.


Opening Reception: Thursday, July 12, 2018, 6PM-8PM


NYU is grateful to the Keith Haring Foundation for its support of The Unflinching Eye.

THE MAMDOUHA BOBST GALLERY
70 Washington Square South | New York | NY | 10012

NYU Libraries Invites You to INPUT 2018 (April 30- May 4, Brooklyn)

The NYU Division of Libraries is pleased to offer complimentary registration for INPUT 2018 to NYU students and alumni.  A NYU Libraries sponsor is making this opportunity available to 50 members of the NYU community, and we’re delighted to share it with you!

  

INPUT 2018

INPUT 2018 is a convergence of international public television storytellers that will take place in Brooklyn, NY. NYU students and alumni interested in media and public television are invited to attend this conference.

Host: Forest Creatures Foundation

Co-Hosts: WNET and Brooklyn College

Dates: April 30 – May 4

Registration Fee: An anonymous donor is generously sponsoring attendance for 50 NYU students and alumni. The registration fee for all sessions will be covered; this fee covers your attendance to any or all of the conference sessions. 

(**Any transportation costs and the attendance to the Midweek Party, which is $40, are not included.)

Registration deadline: April 20

(**We can accept RSVPs beyond this date, however only those who have registered by April 20 will have their name appear on the delegate list.)

Questions and registration, please contact: Whitney Lee @ wl1148@nyu.edu or whitney.lee@nyu.edu

 

Location: Williamsburg Cinemas (217 Grand St., Brooklyn, NY 11211)

About the event: Discussion topics include the role of public broadcasters in the arena of children’s programming, the use of historic archival material to tell new stories, and the definition of the “war victim” as storyteller. Unlike festivals and markets, the intention of the conference is to exchange, discuss, and share.

Lunch panels include:  A “Conversation with NOVA,” the WNET Hamilton documentary, and Diversity in US Public Television being produced by Harlem based Black Public Media.  There will also be an opportunity for registered delegates to have lunch with commissioning editors from around the world at the Brooklyn Winery where they can pitch their projects, or whatever.   

 

Schedule:

April 30: Opening reception (5 pm)

May 1: Screenings and discussion (9 am – 7 pm)

 

Topic: Parental Guidance Suggested: The role of public broadcasters in the arena of children’s programming.

May 2: Screenings and discussion (9 am – 7 pm)    TBD

May 3: Screenings and discussion (9 am – 4 pm); midweek party from 6 pm – 11 pm

               

Topic: History As You Have Never Seen it Before: Innovative ways of using historic archive material to tell new stories

 

May 4: Screenings and discussion (9 am – 4 pm)

Topic: Telling War Stories, Far From the Front Lines

 

For more information about session topics:  http://input-tv.org/home

Moderators: http://input-tv.org/input-2018/moderators

Please visit www.input-tv.org for additional details.

 

 

INPUT was founded on the principle that every culture is valuable and deserves respect and recognition. It stimulates an increased awareness of cultural, societal, and national sensibilities as they relate to public television programming from around the world. It has an impact internationally on the delegates attending the conference and, through dialogue, on their colleagues back home. This professional development enriches program selection and thereby benefits the delegates’ respective public television audiences.

 

Timbuktu and Beyond: The Past, Present and Future of West African Manuscript Collections (4/11 at 6:30pm, Bobst)

Timbuktu and Beyond: The Past, Present and Future of West African Manuscript Collections

A fundamental source for the history of West Africa lies in rich archival collections, most famously the manuscript libraries of Timbuktu. Documents from the Mali and Songhai Empires and the centuries before European colonial rule offer a vital window into the region’s complex ties to the wider Muslim world, and to cultures and polities in Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. The participants will discuss their experiences with West African documents, as well as the challenges of consulting and protecting these renowned archives of human history.
 
Wednesday, April 11 | 6:30-8:00PM (doors at 6pm)
Tamiment Library (10th floor, Elmer Holmes Bobst Library)
Open to the public | Light refreshments

RSVP

  • Ousmane Kane, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor of Islamic Religion and Society, Harvard Divinity School; author of  Beyond Timbuktu: An Intellectual History of Muslim West Africa (Harvard UP, 2016)
  • Michael Gomez, Professor of History, New York University; author of African Dominion: A New History of Empire in Early and Medieval West Africa (Princeton UP, 2017)
  • Alexandra Huddleston, photographer and photojournalist; author of 333 Saints: A Life of Scholarship in Timbuktu (Kyoudai, 2013)
 
(Co-sponsored by New York University’s Elmer Holmes Bobst Library, Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies Department, History Department, Africana Studies Department, and Medieval & Renaissance Center, with support from Long Island University’s Palmer School of Library and Information Science.)

Annual Fales Lecture: “Quipus, Quipolas, and Hrönir in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Europe” (4/4 at 6pm, Bobst)

The Annual Fales Lecture:  “Quipus, Quipolas, and Hrönir in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Europe”

 
The annual Fales Lecture in English and American Literature will be delivered by Galen Brokaw, Associate Professor and Head of Modern Languages and Literatures at Montana State University. Professor Brokaw is a scholar of Colonial Latin America and Early Modern Spain, New World historiography, and Indigenous Latin American cultures. The author of A History of the Khipu (Cambridge UP, 2010), Professor Brokaw will lecture on “Quipus, Quipolas, and Hrönir in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Europe”. His presentation discusses the emergence of the quipu, a knotted string device used by the Incas to record information, as a physical object in the European imagination, and places this emergence in the broader context of European thought. 
 
Wednesday, April 4, at 6:00 PM 
Fales Library & Special Collections
New York, NY 10012
 
Please RSVP if you plan to attend.  We look forward to seeing you there!