Library 101: Using Google Scholar

Welcome to Library 101! In this series, the Libraries will be providing you with helpful information about the valuable services and resources we offer. This week’s post will help you make better use of the Libraries’ resources with a search engine many of you are already using: Google Scholar!

In case you didn’t know, there are two quick changes you can make to your settings in Google Scholar which will allow you to access NYU’s subscriptions and more easily manage the information you find.

To make this change, click the “Settings” gear near the top of the screen. This will take you to your “Scholar Settings,” and you’ll find a “Library Links” option to click.

There, you should search “New York University” in the search box and put a check beside the “New York University Libraries— GetIt@NYU” option.

Next, click on the “Search Results” option to find the “Bibliography Manager” choices and choose a citation manager such as RefWorks or Endnote. Finally, click the “Save preferences” button at the bottom of your screen.

Now, when you search Google Scholar, you’ll always see a “GetIt@NYU” link, which allows you to take advantage of NYU Libraries’ full-text journal subscriptions just like you do when searching any of our library databases. You’ll also see an “Import into RefWorks” or “Import into EndNote” link by each item in your results list.

Happy searching!

Join Digital Scholarship Services for an Open Access Week Panel on October 26th!

Open Access Week is an international event supporting open access to scholarly research. In recent years, we’ve seen an increase in the number of digital repositories where scholars may freely share their publications and data. To celebrate Open Access Week, we’ve invited the founders of two prominent new multi-disciplinary repositories to discuss their goals and priorities, and the technology underlying their systems. Humanities Commons is a social repository for humanists launched by the Modern Language Association in collaboration with Columbia University Libraries. SocArXiv is a preprint service directed by group of sociologists and research librarians in partnership with the Center for Open Science. We’ll have a round-table discussion with plenty of time for questions from the audience. This event is open to the public.

When: Wednesday, October 26th, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.

Where: Avery Room, 2nd floor of Bobst Library

Panelists:

  • Philip Cohen, University of Maryland
  • Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Modern Language Association
  • Mark Newton, Columbia University Libraries
  • Nicholas Wolf, NYU Libraries

Sponsored by NYU Libraries Digital Scholarship Services. If you have any questions, please email the DSS team at digital.scholarship@nyu.edu.

Alex Bero & Maggie Schreiner to Discuss the Gardiner Project at Bobst Library

Please join us for a presentation by Alex Bero and Maggie Schreiner, who will be discussing their work for the Gardiner Project during Archives Week 2016. They will focus on the digitization of two collections with different needs and priorities. The full program description is available from The Archivists Roundtable.

The event will take place Thursday, October 20th, at 4 p.m. in Bobst Library, Berol room (Floor 3).

Please RSVP should you like to attend.

Open in Action: A panel discussion for Open Access Week

Join Digital Scholarship Services at NYU Libraries for an Open Access Week panel discussion on Wednesday, October 26, 2016.

Open in Action: New Options for Sharing Scholarship

In recent years, we’ve seen an increase in the number of services for scholars to freely share their publications and data. Some of these are commercial: Mendelay and SSRN (both now owned by Elsevier), Academia.edu (misleadingly named, since it is not affiliated with an educational institution), and ReseachGate. In the past two decades, many colleges and universities have offered institutional repositories, such as NYU’s own Faculty Digital Archive. And there are non-profit discipline-based repositories, such as arXiv.org (physics, math, computer science) , RePEc (economics), and Cogprints (cognitive sciences). It’s a complex mix of options for scholars.

To celebrate Open Access Week, we’ve invited the founders of two prominent new multi-disciplinary repositories to discuss their goals and priorities, and the technology underlying their systems. Humanities Commons is a social repository for humanists launched by the Modern Language Association in collaboration with Columbia University Libraries. SocArXiv is a preprint service directed by group of sociologists and research librarians in partnership with the Center for Open Science. We’ll have a round-table discussion with plenty of time for questions from the audience. This event is open to the public.

Open Access Week is an international event supporting open access to scholarly research.

Wednesday, October 26, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.

Avery Room, 2nd floor of Bobst Library

Panelists 

Philip Cohen, University of Maryland

Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Modern Language Association

Mark Newton, Columbia University Libraries

Nicholas Wolf, NYU Libraries

Sponsored by NYU Libraries Digital Scholarship Services. For more information, email digital.scholarship@nyu.edu

Join NYU Press at Their Centennial Celebration!

jelani-cobbJoin us on October 27th for the NYU Press Centennial Lecture, featuring Jelani Cobb (staff writer at The New Yorker and Professor of Journalism at Columbia university) in conversation with Greg Grandin (Professor of History at NYU) on race, citizenship, and the 2016 election.

NYU Press will be hosting this event at Judson Memorial Church, 55 Washington Square South. The doors open at 6 p.m., and the lecture begins at 6:30, with a reception to follow. This event is free and open to the public.

Please RSVP to rsvp@nyupress.org.

Data Services Mediates Access to Gallup World Poll and U.S. Daily Tracking Respondent-Level Data

NYU Libraries has been providing access to a range of Gallup public opinion polling data through the Gallup Analytics tool and the Gallup Poll interface. With these tools, users can access public opinion data and export aggregate data at the country level.

gallup_corporate_logoNow, thanks to a new data license acquisition by the Libraries, individuals in the NYU community can access Gallup World Poll and U.S. Daily Tracking data at the respondent level, which provides a much-enhanced ability to trace connections between concepts and countries.

What is Gallup World Poll and U.S. Daily Tracking?

Before requesting access to Gallup World Poll or U.S. Daily Tracking respondent-level data, it helps to know a little about these surveys and the data associated with them. According to Gallup, the data are developed by survey collectors who call people in countries that have high access to telephones. Or, in the case of countries that have low access to phones, survey staff actually go on the ground and ask questions relating to economic confidence, quality of life, food access, freedom of media, practice of religion, and other core indicators. Note that the exact text of each question and the exact place its asked can vary; not every question is asked in the same place each year, and the phrasing of each question is meant to approximate a common meaning across language and culture. Please let us know if you’d like to see the World Poll Methodology, and we can provide a copy of it.

gallup-world-migration

The U.S. Daily Tracking poll works similarly. 350 days per year, 1000 random U.S. adults are asked questions pertaining to economic confidence and quality of life. See the full description of the survey here. In all, Gallup is one of the most comprehensive and well-documented public opinion surveys that exists, and having full access to the respondent-level data is a great step for the NYU community.

Access Instructions for Gallup World Poll

In order to access respondent-level data for Gallup World Poll, you first need to be a current NYU faculty, student, or staff member and create an account with Gallup’s World Poll Reference Tool. The Reference Tool is not the source of the data itself but instead a search mechanism to discover which questions were asked in specific countries during specific years. With this information, the Data Services team can identify and extract relevant data for your project. Refer to the World Poll Reference Tool Guidebook for instructions on creating an account and performing searches.

There are several ways you can discover which questions or data is available. You can search by place (country), year, and theme or topic. Let’s use the World Poll as an example. Say you are interested in researching the concept of happiness in the world. You can enter a keyword search for “happiness”:gallup-world-poll-reference-toolIt helps to enter keywords that are liable to be included in the text of a question itself. Once you discover relevant question(s), you can expand the interface and see the specific QTAG, study completion dates, and countries covered. For the sake of ease, you can even export information on question coverage into a .CSV.

To help the Data Services team access the subset of data that you need, all you have to do from here is get back to us with the following specific information:

  • QTAG (e.g., WP6878)
  • Dates (e.g., 2008-2012)
  • Countries (e.g., United States, Canada, United Kingdom, France)

Note: Indicators like gender, which may be useful, exist as their own question QTAGs, so you may want to request the inclusion of these for more robust analysis. Once we have this information, we will compile a data extract and deliver it to you.

Access Instructions for Gallup U.S. Daily Tracking

Getting access to respondent-level data from the Gallup U.S. Daily Tracking survey requires a slightly different process. There is no comparable discovery tool for U.S. Daily Tracking poll questions; instead, users are encouraged to search in the Gallup Analytics portal. Within this portal, you can drill down to specific daily questions that are nested within a range of broader categories like Religion & Ethics, Quality of Life, Health, Well-being, Government & Politics, and more.

daily-gallup

Once you’ve identified a specific question that has data, just let us know what it is, which states you’re interested in, and through what years? Our coverage spans between 2008 and 2016. We are also happy to provide the methodology for the U.S. Daily Tracking poll upon request.

Codebooks

To help make working with the data a little easier once you’ve gotten access to it, we’ve generated some codebooks to interpret the variables and range of answers within each question. Note that these change over time, so refer to the codebooks below for each year.

Updates

Note that we receive batch updates of data once per quarter for the U.S. Daily Tracking set and once per year (usually around late January) for the WorldPoll set. The update in January would cover the previous year.

Questions

If you have any questions about accessing Gallup’s respondent-level data for World Poll or the U.S. Daily Tracking at NYU, don’t hesitate to reach out to Data Services (data.services@nyu.edu).