Students with Wellness and/or Academic Issues

According the NYU’s Student Health Center—wellness issues are broadly defined as anything related to day-to-day challenges, but might also include medical issues, academic stress, depression, sexual assault, suicidal thoughts, anxiety, alcohol and other drug dependence, sexually transmitted infections, and eating disorders.

Resources When Students Have Academic Issues

Gallatin Office of Advising
advising.gallatin@nyu.edu

Resources When Bullying, Threatening and Other Disruptive Behavior Occurs

When a student is targeted by bullying or other threatening or disruptive behavior and believes that the behavior places him or her in danger, please contact the NYU Department of Public Safety or the New York City Police Department. These resources should also be contacted if disruptive behavior in the classroom poses a threat to a faculty member. If the behavior does not pose a threat, the faculty member is authorized to ask the student to leave the classroom and, where deemed necessary, to call the NYU Department of Public Safety to assist in the student’s removal from the premises. In any of these cases, Gallatin’s Office of Student Affairs should also be notified.

NYU Department of Public Safety
(212) 998-2222

Rahul Hamid, Director, Student Affairs
rahul.hamid@nyu.edu
(212) 992-7750

Richard Jung, Assistant Director of Student Affairs
richard.jung@nyu.edu
(212) 998-1542

Resources When Students Have Wellness Issues

Gallatin’s Office of Student Affairs assists students with a broad spectrum of wellness issues, as well as with leaves of absence, academic performance, school/life balance, housing issues, semester withdrawals, stress management, adjusting to college issues and personal conflicts. Professional staff members are available to listen and to provide limited counseling to help students identify what may be troubling them and to develop strategies to cope. Student Affairs also connects students with NYU’s Counseling and Wellness Services for more extensive individual counseling, and to provide information on low-cost referrals.

Rahul Hamid, Director, Student Affairs
rahul.hamid@nyu.edu
(212) 992-7750

Richard Jung, Assistant Director of Student Affairs
richard.jung@nyu.edu
(212) 998-1542

The Wellness Exchange is NYU’s extensive network of health and mental health resources. If a student is in distress and needs immediate assistance, he or she should contact the Wellness Exchange Hotline, available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Additionally, students can email the Wellness Exchange or visit a counselor during walk-in hours (no appointment necessary).

Wellness Exchange
726 Broadway, 4th floor
wellness.exchange@nyu.edu
Hotline: (212) 443-9999 (available 24/7)

If you have questions at any time, or wish to consult about a student, do not hesitate to contact the Wellness Exchange at (212) 443-9999. If an immediate assessment of a student is necessary, please know that by calling the hotline, a counselor can be dispatched to your classroom to assist you. In addition, the Student Health Center has an excellent on-line resource— available at www.nyu.edu/999/handbook—to assist faculty members in dealing with an NYU student who may be having mental health issues or is in crisis. You can also access this website by logging into NYUHome, and clicking on the “NYU Life” tab.

The Office of Equal Opportunity is available to students, faculty and staff with respect to any questions and concerns about sexual harassment, sexual violence, or other forms of discrimination on the basis of sex. New York University is committed to complying with Title IX and enforcing University policies prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex.

Mary Signor, Executive Director
mary.signor@nyu.edu
(212) 998-2370

Student victims and complainants in situations involving sexual assault are afforded certain rights specified in the Policy on Sexual Assault, Harassment and Other forms of Sexual Misconduct. Where immediate assistance is required, emergency help is available. In addition to using the complaint procedures under University policies, a victim of sexual misconduct has the option to report the incident to the appropriate local authorities and the University will assist victims in doing so.

The NYU Wellness Exchange also provides support and resources for sexual assault prevention and response.

What You Can Do as Faculty

Be alert to signs that a student may be in distress or danger. These indicators include a decline in quality or timeliness of work; repeated unexplained absences or lateness; writings or comments that express despair, rage, or isolation; deterioration in physical appearance or personal hygiene; extreme negative moods, or signs of substance abuse such as alcohol odor or bloodshot eyes. Inform Gallatin’s Office of Student Affairs. Student Affairs will email or phone the student. The objective is to assess the presenting issue(s) and then recommend next steps.

Rahul Hamid, Director, Student Affairs
rahul.hamid@nyu.edu
(212) 992-7750

Richard Jung, Assistant Director of Student Affairs
richard.jung@nyu.edu
(212) 998-1542

You can talk to the student privately if you notice signs of distress. Express your concern, point out specifically the signs you’ve observed, and ask what’s wrong. Be patient, supportive, and wary of quick dismissals (“It’s nothing, I’m fine.”). You do not have to take on the role of counselor. Usually, listening carefully should make clear whether a problem interferes with a student’s well-being and/or school performance.

Suggest to a student that he or she make use of Gallatin’s Office of Student Affairs or NYU’s Wellness Exchange services on his/her own. It may help to point out that the Office of Student Affairs can facilitate the initial contact with the Wellness Exchange. You may also want to inform the student that Wellness Exchange services are confidential, free of charge, and do not require that students have health insurance.

If you have questions at any time, or wish to consult about a student, do not hesitate to contact the Wellness Exchange at (212) 443-9999. If an immediate assessment of a student is necessary, please know that by calling the hotline, a counselor can be dispatched to your classroom to assist you. In addition, the Student Health Center has an excellent on-line resource— available at www.nyu.edu/999/handbook—to assist faculty members in dealing with an NYU student who may be having mental health issues or is in crisis. You can also access this website by logging into NYUHome, and clicking on the “NYU Life” tab.