assessment_stacked

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What?

Assessment provides ongoing information meant to gauge how well a student is learning material, and the use of that feedback to improve learning. Evaluation, in contrast, focuses on the end (summative) results of a student’s performance, such as a final course or exam grade. Both involve measures to assess student performance. For assessment ideas & templates, go to the Teaching Strategies – Assessment page.


 Why?

Assessment is meant to be a positive opportunity for feedback on learning according to some observable outcomes. Instead of happening at the end of a course or project or degree, it happens throughout the learning and is a joint effort between student and instructor.


 Where?

There are several automated and manual ways of assessing learning. The digital tools are described below, and specific techniques and ideas are described in the Assessment section in Teaching Strategies.


 How?

Proper assessment requires mapping learning goals to desired learning outcomes, and then creating ways to measure evidence against these criteria. Generally, assessment features formative and low-stakes measures since the emphasis is on identifying areas of potential improvement rather than a summative, end-goal evaluation.


 Tools?

These are broken down by the following types of assessment:

  • Formative: the focus is on continuous monitoring of student performance and learning of smaller components over time. One goal is for the student and/or instructor to identify learning gaps or areas of improvement during a course, so that proper interventions can happen. Formative assessment is often low stakes, meaning that activities are not weighed heavily in relation to a grade.
  • Summative: focus is on measuring the overall learning gains of a student, usually done at the end of a course or project.
  • Group: measuring of learning and performance for team-based assignments.  Often leverages peer review.

Please make an appointment with us if you want to discuss options and feasibility.

Formative / low stakes Summative Group
Clicker tools

  • See the Clicker tool page for using online or physical clicker technology to poll students, ask short answer questions, or multiple choice activities.

NYU Classes tools

  • Audio recording feature in the Rich Text Editor: anywhere you see a textbox that has formatting/ editing options, you will notice a microphone icon (second row, near the YouTube upload button).   This nifty feature allows students to record audio responses to questions.
  • Interactive modules tool: SCORM modules (see Interactive modules page for details) can now be uploaded to NYU Classes. These modules have the capacity to include short learning checks throughout a module to test comprehension and the scores can be ported over to the Gradebook.
  • Lessons Tool: with this tool, you can build lessons that are composed of parts that can have prerequisites, or content that is required to be completed before moving on to another section. This can be a nice way to monitor students’ progress of progressively difficult material.
  • Peer review feature in Assignments tool: NYU Classes now allows for peer reviewed assignments. You select the number of reviews, and the system randomly assigns reviews for each student. Only those who submit assignments will be assigned peer reviews.
  • Tests & Quizzes tool: allows the creation of low stakes quizzes (pass/fail or a few points) that test knowledge or identify areas of improvement. The various question types include: audio response, hotspots, multiple choice, numeric value, fill-in-the-blank, short answer, and more.

Survey tools (use to get a quick idea of students’ prior knowledge or skills)

  • Google forms (free with gmail account): enables you to create surveys in a drag-and-drop manner. Includes check boxes, multiple choice, text boxes, and more.   Allows for some logic. *New feature: you can now create Quizzes with Google Forms!
  • Qualtrics (free with NYU account): sophisticated survey tool that has dozens of question types, data visualization, and logic scenarios.
Customized rubrics

  • This does not involve any specific tool, but is rather an approach to map learning goals to course and program objectives. We can work with you to create these rubrics in order to gauge student performance at the end of a course.

NYU Classes tools

  • Assignments tool: Students can submit final papers, etc. directly though the Assignments tool. Great for keeping track of submissions (no more getting lost in your email) and setting firm submission dates. You can also submit grades in Classes and students have instant access to feedback and grades.
  • Tests & Quizzes tool: allows the creation of higher stakes tests that test cumulative knowledge. The various question types include: audio response, hotspots, multiple choice, numeric value, fill-in-the-blank, short answer, and more. Please note that if you need a more robust way of confirming student identity, you will need something like iProctor (see below).

Security / Plagarism (these tools are meant to reduce the occurrence of plagarism or reduce cheating or identity swapping for online assignments):

  • Respondus (licensed product): robust testing software with enhanced security measures.
  • ProctorU (licensed product): can integrate with tests offered through NYU Classes. Students sign up for a free account and have a person remotely proctor the test. Suitable to high-stakes, online tests.
  • TurnItIn (integrated with NYU Classes): allows students to submit papers or text-based assignments and identifies areas of plagarism.
Customized rubrics

  • This does not involve any specific tool, but is rather an approach to guide students’ group participation according to specific benchmarks and parameters. We can work with you to create these metrics.

NYU Classes tools

Peer review feature in Assignments tool: NYU Classes now allows for peer reviewed assignments. You select the number of reviews, and the system randomly assigns reviews for each student. Only those who submit assignments will be assigned peer reviews.


Survey tools (use of survey tools to gauge student’s own and classmates’ performance during a group project)

  • Google forms (free with gmail account): enables you to create surveys in a drag-and-drop manner. Includes check boxes, multiple choice, text boxes, and more.   Allows for some logic.
  • Qualtrics (free with NYU account): sophisticated survey tool that has dozens of question types, data visualization, and logic scenarios.