Category: Events

Open in Action: A panel discussion for Open Access Week

Join Digital Scholarship Services at NYU Libraries for an Open Access Week panel discussion on Wednesday, October 26, 2016.

Open in Action: New Options for Sharing Scholarship

In recent years, we’ve seen an increase in the number of services for scholars to freely share their publications and data. Some of these are commercial: Mendelay and SSRN (both now owned by Elsevier), Academia.edu (misleadingly named, since it is not affiliated with an educational institution), and ReseachGate. In the past two decades, many colleges and universities have offered institutional repositories, such as NYU’s own Faculty Digital Archive. And there are non-profit discipline-based repositories, such as arXiv.org (physics, math, computer science) , RePEc (economics), and Cogprints (cognitive sciences). It’s a complex mix of options for scholars.

To celebrate Open Access Week, we’ve invited the founders of two prominent new multi-disciplinary repositories to discuss their goals and priorities, and the technology underlying their systems. Humanities Commons is a social repository for humanists launched by the Modern Language Association in collaboration with Columbia University Libraries. SocArXiv is a preprint service directed by group of sociologists and research librarians in partnership with the Center for Open Science. We’ll have a round-table discussion with plenty of time for questions from the audience. This event is open to the public.

Open Access Week is an international event supporting open access to scholarly research.

Wednesday, October 26, 4:30 – 6:00 p.m.

Avery Room, 2nd floor of Bobst Library

Panelists 

Philip Cohen, University of Maryland

Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Modern Language Association

Mark Newton, Columbia University Libraries

Nicholas Wolf, NYU Libraries

Sponsored by NYU Libraries Digital Scholarship Services. For more information, email digital.scholarship@nyu.edu

NYU #nycdhweek workshops a great success!

#nycdhweek word cloud

Word cloud of tweets with #nycdhweek hashtag.

NYU Digital Scholarship Services participated in the first annual NYCDH Week, a week-long celebration of all things digital humanities in New York City, February 8-12, 2016.

NYCDH Week, organized by the New York City Digital Humanities Group, offered open workshops across the city, networking sessions, a meeting of the DH community, and of course social events.

The 6 NYU workshops for NYCDH Week were a great success, covering topics such as Omeka, social media scraping for qualitative research, APIs for humanities research, and an introduction to working at the command line. We had 84 total attendees representing every school at NYU as well as the larger NYCDH community.

A few quotes from workshop instructors:

The event succeeded in helping attendees feel more comfortable with the command line, and also demonstrated several ways this tool can be incorporated in research projects.

In the Social Media Scraping workshop, attendees used NCapture and NVivo and learned methods to incorporate the context from web pages, online PDFs, and social media into their research design.

Keep an eye out on this space, subscribe to liblink, and to the NYUDH group to learn about upcoming workshops and other events.

Celebrating NYCDH Week, February 8-12, 2016

nycdhlogo-trim

Come celebrate NYCDH Week 2016 with NYU Digital Scholarship Services and the rest of the NYCDH community!

DHWeek is a week-long celebration of all things DH in New York City that includes networking sessions, a meeting of the DH community, open workshops offered across the city, and of course social events.

That week, we are offering 5 workshops at  Bobst Library. Registration is required so sign up now.

Introduction to Omeka

Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. This workshop will explain the basics of why and when to use Omeka and include a walkthrough of how to use Omeka to manage online collections and create digital exhibitions.

Date: Monday, February 8, 2016
Time: 10:00am – 12:00pm
Location: Bobst Library, Rm. 619, 6th Floor

Advanced Omeka

Building on the Introduction to Omeka workshop, this workshop will show you how to gain greater control of your Omeka installation. Participants will learn the difference between different deployments of Omeka, how to manage your own hosted Omeka installation, and how to use plugins, themes, HTML, CSS, and PHP to customize your collections and exhibitions. Some familiarity with web file transfers, web design, and content management system administration is recommended.

Date: Monday, February 8, 2016
Time: 1:00pm – 3:00pm
Location: Bobst Library, Rm. 619, 6th Floor

Public Participation in Humanities Research: Using APIs and Crowd Sourcing Platforms (Intro level)

Participants will learn how to use Internet Archive’s API to pull a set of documents from the web. They will then test a hypothesis by loading those documents onto a crowd sourcing website and asking others to answer questions about those documents.

Note: You must bring your own laptop with Vagrant and Virtual Box pre-installed. (Instructions on sign-up page)

Date: Monday, February 8, 2016
Time: 1:00pm – 3:00pm
Location: Avery Fisher Center, East Room, 2nd Floor

Intro to the Command Line

Learn how to use the command line to perform basic tasks. We’ll begin by discussing why humanists would want to learn something so technical, then jump into learning how to create and edit files and directories. Knowledge of the command line can be applied in many contexts, including several of the other workshops offered this week!

Date: Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Time: 3:00pm – 5:00pm
Location: Bobst Library, 613, 6th Floor

Social Media Scraping for Qualitative Research (Introductory Level)

This workshop will introduce the basics of using small-scale web scraping of social media for qualitative analysis. Using NCapture, a web browser extension, and NVivo, a qualitative analysis software package, this session will focus on methods to incorporate the context from web pages, online PDFs, and social media into your research design. Presenters will provide detailed examples for importing and coding Facebook and Twitter data using the NVivo software platform. In addition, discussions may include topics such as collecting, storing, and reporting social media data as academic researchers. Brief overview of aims of Qualitative Research and NVivo Software will be provided. Please note that this workshop will not cover larger data sets and web scraping using tools like Python or R.

Introductory level.

Date: Thursday, February 11, 2016
Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
Location: Bobst Library, Rm. 617, 6th Floor

 

Spring 2015 Public Lectures in Digital Humanities

Polonsky Foundation Public Lectures in Digital Humanities

These events are open to the public; registration is not required. All workshops will be held in Bobst Library’s Avery Fisher Center. Attendees without an NYU ID card should enter at the guard’s desk in the library’s atrium.

Follow the links below for more information.

Molly O’Hagan Hardy: The Presence of the Past April 2nd, 5-6:30pm
With examples from the eighteenth-century transatlantic book trade as represented in library catalogs and content databases, Molly O’Hagan Hardy will examine time’s traces in the archives and how such traces can be re-conceived or eclipsed in digital humanities projects.

Miriam Posner: Head-and-Shoulder-Hunting in the Americas May 28th, 1-2:30pm
Between 1936 and 1967, Walter Freeman, a prominent neurologist, lobotomized as many as 3,500 Americans. In this presentation, Miriam Posner will detail her efforts to understand why Freeman was so devoted to this practice, using computer-assisted image-mining and -analysis techniques.

Mark Algee-Hewitt June 4th, 1-2:30pm
This talk explores the meaning behind the practical aspects of Digital Humanities analyses and probes the delicate balance we maintain as we apply the critical methodologies of the humanities to the algorithmically derived, statistically significant data that lies behind our results.

Jennifer Giuliano: Humanities Infrastructure versus the Digital Humanities June 9th, 1-2:30pm
This lecture will explore the ways in which digital humanities and its associated research projects have challenged the often-overlapping, but frequently problematic, technical and social architectures of the academy.

Spring 2015 Workshops in Digital Humanities for NYU Graduate Students

Polonsky Foundation Graduate Student Workshops in Digital Humanities: Tools and Methods

The 2015 Polonsky Foundation Graduate Student Workshops in Digital Humanities offer NYU graduate students an intensive introduction to tools and methods for digital scholarship through day-long, hands-on sessions with experts in the field. Workshops will explore diverse approaches to research ranging from text markup and analysis to data visualization and mapping.

You must register to attend. All workshops will be held in Bobst Library.

Follow the links below for more information and to register.

Bibliographic Metadata for Digital Humanists, April 3rd, 9:30-4
This workshop will introduce methods for extracting metadata from different types of online catalogs and will include a brief overview of Machine-Readable Cataloging (MARC), the chief format for bibliographic information.

Geospatial Analysis and the Digital Humanities: Principles, Tools, and Process, April 10th, 9:30-4
Digital humanists often incorporate Geographic Information Systems (GIS)  into the process of interpreting texts and culture. This workshop will explore some of these methods as we integrate several data sets into GIS software and mapping platforms designed for digital humanities inquiry.

Copyright Issues for Digital Humanists, April 17th, 2-5pm
This workshop will start with an overview of general copyright issues, and then delve into specific issues and practical applications of copyright law in digital humanities.

DH101, May 27th, 9:30-4
Many DH projects rely on a core set of skills: finding, cleaning, and organizing data; asking meaningful questions of that data; and visualizing it. In this workshop, we’ll work together on one set of sources, going from zero to DH project over the course of a day.

DH DevOps: Core Skills and Foundations, May 29th, 9:30-4
Building on the DH101 workshop, we will cover the foundations of critical computing in the humanities.

Introduction to TEI, June 2nd, 9:30-4
This session will teach the basics of coding in XML (eXtensible Markup Language) using the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines.

Large Scale Text Analysis with R, June 3rd, 9:30-4
In this workshop, we will explore the different methods through which text mining can be used to “read” text in new ways.

Introduction to Project Development, June 8th, 9:30-4
This workshop will explore the fundamentals of project planning and design.

Content, Curation, and Publication: Using WordPress and Omeka to Tell Scholarly Stories, June 10th, 9:30-4
This workshop will explore how the platforms WordPress and Omeka can help scholars publish their work by creating dynamic digital publications and exhibitions.

HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities

HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities

Thursday January 15, 5:00- 6:30, reception to follow; books available for sale.

Jurow Lecture Hall at New York University Silver Center, Room 101, 100 Washington Square East (entrance on Washington Place)

Todd Presner discusses his collaboratively authored new book, co-edited with David Shepard and Yoh Kawano, a metaLAB project from Harvard University Press, and tours its companion website http://www.hypercities.com/. Todd Presner is Sady and Ludwig Kahn Director of the Center for Jewish Studies, Professor of Germanic Languages and Comparative Literature, and Chair of the Digital Humanities Program at the University of California, Los Angeles.

In conversation with:

Matthew K. GoldAssociate Professor of English and Digital Humanities, Graduate Center, CUNY; Director of the CUNY Academic Commons and Editor of Debates in the Digital Humanities (University of Minnesota Press, 2012)

Laura Kurgan, Associate Professor of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, and Director of the Spatial Information Design Lab at Columbia University, and author of Close Up, at a Distance: Mapping, Technology, Politics (Zone Books, the MIT Press, 2013)

Introduced by Thomas Augst, Associate Professor of English and Acting Director of Digital Humanities, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, New York University

Part of the metaLAB series of books about the digital humanities, HyperCities: Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities (2014) is a collaboratively authored and designed exploration of mapping cities over time. The primary authors are Todd Presner, David Shepard, and Yoh Kawano, with contributions by Philip Ethington, Mike Blockstein, Reanne Estrada, Chris Johanson, Diane Favro, and Xarene Eskandar. A digital platform transmogrified into a book, it profiles the ambitious online project of the same name that maps the historical layers of city spaces in an interactive, hypermedia environment. The authors examine the media archaeology of Google Earth and the cultural–historical meaning of map projections, and explore recent events—the “Arab Spring” and the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster—through social media mapping that incorporates data visualizations, photographic documents, and Twitter streams. HyperCities includes a “ghost map” of downtown Los Angeles, polyvocal memory maps of LA’s historic Filipinotown, avatar-based explorations of ancient Rome, and hour-by-hour mappings of the 2009 Tehran election protests.

This in an NYC-DH event, sponsored by NYU Libraries, in partnership with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of New York University.

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