Glossary

 

  • Asynchronous/synchronous: virtual student-centered teaching methods (mediated by an instructor) that indicate how learning is applied in a range of time and space. Asynchronous learning refers to a learning practice that adjusts to the student’s own time and location, giving him/her full autonomy on when and where to explore the content; synchronous learning refers to forms of virtual learning that occur in real time, but not in the same place.
  • Content Management System (CMS): a computer application that enables content management (publishing, editing, organizing) through a central interface. WordPress and NYU’s Web Publishing are good examples of CMSs.
  • Creative Commons (CC): a non-profit organization that generates creative licenses for original works to be shared digitally. Through the Creative Commons license, you may determine which rights to reserve and which to waive to others for actions such as sharing, editing, adapting and commercially using your work.
  • Digital Humanities (DH): a research area that intersects computing and humanities disciplines.
  • Distance Learning: an off-site education mode that often relies on different instructional technology to offer the most tangible learning experience for the student. “Distance Learning” may refer to course-long offsite learning, or singular sessions within a traditional onsite course (see Blended Learning, below).
  • Blended Learning: an instructional model that implements content delivery and activities via online and digital platforms as a complement to the traditional in-person classroom model.
  • Hybrid Learning: often used as a synonym for “blended learning,” hybrid learning is an online learning model that implements a mix of synchronous and asynchronous instruction.
  • Flipped: an instructional model that delivers educational content outside of the classroom (often online) while reserving face-to-face interactions with students for active and/or immersive learning methods.
  • Instructional Media: any material used to mediate instruction, such as chalkboard, a projector, photographs, maps, etc., generally aimed at facilitating learning.
  • Instructional Modality (as per NYU Albert): the three instructional modalities in SIS/Albert are defined by the format of active instructional time in the course as online, in-person, or blended. See more detailed information at NYU’s Instructional Technology Glossary.
  • Learning Management System (LMS): a software application dedicated to the management, creation, editing, and sharing of educational materials such as syllabi, readings, grade books, rosters, and lesson plans. Similar to a CMS, Learning Management Systems serve a more particular use, and are especially useful for distance learning. NYU Classes is the university’s official LMS.
  • Learning Tools Interoperability (LTI): a rigorous standard specified by the IMS Global Education Consortium for digital learning applications towards optimal integration with one another. Typically, universities will utilize a LTI-compliant Learning Management System that can integrate third-party LTI-compliant applications within its own interface, and without the need for additional sign-in.
  • Moodle: a robust, open-source Learning Management System with customization capabilities.
  • Massive, Open, Online Courses (MOOCs): an online (distance learning) course designed for large, unlimited participation and open access.
  • Multimediarefers to a teaching and learning environment that makes use of multiple medium formats, such as text, videos, images, websites, etc.
  • Multimodal: a multimodal approach to teaching encourages students to learn through multiple sensory modalities (visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, etc.).
  • Open Source: software that is open to distribution, development, and modification by users. Read more at http://opensource.org.
  • Optical Character Recognition (OCR)turn images of text into machine/computer readable file. Scanners in Bobst come with OCR software, or you can scan to a pdf then use OCR software to convert it to computer readable text. Find more in our OCR tools post
  • Open Educational Resources (OER): resources for teaching, learning, and research that are made available freely or at a low cost. See NYU Library’s research guide on Affordable and Open Educational Resources or Diving In: The Open Waters of Digital Resources and Open Educational Resources (OER) by Jill Buban, Ph.D for the Online Learning Consortium.