“SOUNDING ISLAM” BOOK EVENT WITH PATRICK EISENLOHR

  • When: November 12, 2018 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
  • Where: HAGOP KEVORKIAN CENTER FOR NEAR EASTERN STUDIES
  • Summary: SOUNDING ISLAM: Voice, Media, and Sonic Atmospheres in an Indian Ocean World
  • Details:

    BOOK EVENT: SOUNDING ISLAM: Voice, Media, and Sonic Atmospheres in an Indian Ocean World (2018, University of California Press) by PATRICK EISENLOHR

    Sounding Islam provides a provocative account of the sonic dimensions of religion, combining perspectives from the anthropology of media and sound studies, as well as drawing on neo-phenomenological approaches to atmospheres. Using long-term ethnographic research on devotional Islam in Mauritius, Patrick Eisenlohr explores how the voice, as a site of divine manifestation, becomes refracted in media practices that have become integral parts of religious traditions. At the core of Eisenlohr’s concern is the interplay of voice, media, affect, and listeners’ religious experiences. Sounding Islam sheds new light on a key dimension of religion, the sonic incitement of sensations that are often difficult to translate into language.

    Reading and Discussion with author PATRICK EISENLOHR (Anthropology, Göttingen, Germany).

    MONDAY / NOVEMBER 12 / 5 PM

    HAGOP KEVORKIAN CENTER FOR NEAR EASTERN STUDIES

    50 WASHINGTON SQUARE SOUTH (map)

    Patrick Eisenlohr heads the research group “Society and Culture in Modern India” at the Centre for Modern Indian Studies (CeMIS) in Göttingen. He completed his PhD in anthropology at the University of Chicago in 2001. From 2001 to 2007 he was assistant professor of anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis, he held an appointment as visiting professor at New York University in 2004, and from 2008 to 2014 he was professor of cultural anthropology at Utrecht University. Patrick Eisenlohr has worked on a range of issues in the anthropology of media, linguistic anthropology and sound studies, especially on the sonic dimensions of religion, media and religion, language, religion, and citizenship, as well as language and diaspora. Together with other members of the research group “Society and Culture in Modern India” he addresses questions of religious and ethnic diversity in contemporary India and in Indian diasporas, with a particular emphasis on urban contexts and its transnational ramifications. The key themes for the research group are: