Tag Archives: Jeh Charles Johnson

Preparing for an Uptick in Congressional Investigations of Corporations

by Susanna M. Buergel, H. Christopher Boehning, Jessica S. Carey, Michael E. Gertzman, Roberto J. Gonzalez, Udi Grofman, Jeh Charles Johnson, Jonathan S. Kanter, Brad S. Karp, Mark F. Mendelsohn, and Alex Young K. Oh

Beginning next month, Democrats will control the House of Representatives for the first time since 2010.  Given the pent-up demand for House Democrats to make robust use of their oversight and investigative authorities, the current relative lull in congressional investigations of corporations is expected to end.  Corporations across sectors should anticipate an uptick in investigative activity. 

In addition to holding the majority for the first time in nearly a decade, this will be the first time that Democrats control the House since a 2015 rule change that empowered a number of committee chairs to subpoena witnesses or documents unilaterally.  The chairs of the following committees, among others, have this authority: Energy and Commerce; Financial Services; Intelligence; Judiciary; Natural Resources; and  Oversight and Government Reform.[1] Continue reading

Cyberspace is the New Battlespace

by Jeh Charles Johnson

[Following personal reflections on his return to private life from public service, former U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Charles Johnson delivered the following keynote address at the Global Cyber Threats: Corporate and Governmental Challenges to Protecting Private Data cybersecurity conference held by the Program on Corporate Compliance and Enforcement at New York University School of Law on April 6, 2018.]

Like millions of other Americans, my world was rocked by the terrorist attack that occurred a few blocks from here on September 11, 2001.  Like many of you, I am a New Yorker, and was in Manhattan that day.  September 11 also happens to be my birthday.  I have a vivid recollection of the day, both before and after 8:46 a.m., when the first plane hit the World Trade Center.  At 9:59 a.m., when the first tower collapsed, it was perhaps the only time in my life when my mind could not believe what my eyes were seeing.  Neither would I have been able to comprehend then that 15 years later, there would be something called the Department of Homeland Security, that I would lead it, and that the Secretary’s New York office would occupy the 50th floor of a taller, stronger World Trade Center tower standing in the same place. Continue reading