Tag Archives: Breon S. Peace

DOJ Issues Guidance on Cooperation In False Claims Act Investigations

by Jennifer Kennedy Park, Breon S. Peace, and Lisa Vicens

DOJ Issues Guidance on Cooperation In False Claims Act Investigations

On May 7, 2019, the Department of Justice (“DOJ” or “the Department”) issued formal guidance to DOJ’s False Claims Act (“FCA”) litigators on the circumstances in which DOJ will grant credit for cooperation during FCA investigations.[1] The guidance explains the factors that DOJ considers in determining whether to award cooperation credit in FCA investigations and the types of credit available.[2] 

Under the guidance, cooperation credit in FCA cases may be earned by voluntarily disclosing misconduct unknown to the government, cooperating in an ongoing investigation or undertaking remedial measures in response to a violation of the FCA.  Aside from taking these steps, a company may receive at least partial credit by identifying individuals with relevant information about the conduct, preserving relevant documents and information beyond existing business practice or legal requirements, and assisting in an ongoing investigation by disclosing relevant facts, among others.  Cooperation credit will take the form of reducing the penalties or damages multiple sought by the DOJ.  The maximum credit that a defendant receives may not surpass the amount of full compensation the government would receive for losses caused by the defendant’s misconduct.  This amount includes government damages, lost interest, costs of investigation and relator share. Continue reading

CFTC Announces Two Significant Awards By Whistleblower Program

by Breon S. Peace, Nowell D. Bamberger, and Patrick C. Swiber

On July 12 and 16, 2018, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) announced two awards to whistleblowers, one its largest-ever award, approximately $30 million, and another its first award to a whistleblower living in a foreign country.[1]  These awards—along with recent proposed changes meant to bolster the Securities and Exchange Commission’s (“SEC” or “Commission”) own whistleblower regime—demonstrate that such programs likely will continue to be significant parts of the enforcement programs of both agencies and necessarily help shape their enforcement agendas in the coming years.

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”) authorized the CFTC to pay awards of between 10 and 30 percent to whistleblowers who voluntarily provide original information to the CFTC leading to the successful enforcement of an action resulting in monetary sanctions exceeding $1 million.[2]  Following the introduction of implementing rules, the CFTC’s program became effective in October 2011.  Over the next six-and-a-half years, the CFTC has paid whistleblower bounties on only four prior occasions, with awards ranging from $50,000 to $10 million.  The $30 million award announced last week, thus, reflects a significant increase.  This week’s award to a foreign whistleblower also represents another first for the CFTC’s program and reflects the global scope of the program. Continue reading