SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2 PM

SCREENING/DISCUSSION

 

SATURDAY / OCTOBER 7 / 2 PM

Ireland House

1 Washington Mews

REBEL ROSSA (2016, 90 mins, Dir: Williams Cole)

 

A personal documentary investigation into the life and legacy of the famous – and infamous – Irish rebel Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa by his American great-grandson told within the context of the controversies leading up to the 100-year anniversary of the Easter Rising in Ireland.

 

Co-sponsors: NYU Ireland House

FRIDAY, MAY 12, 6:30 PM

FRIDAY / MAY 12 / 6:30 PM

CANTOR FILM CENTER, THEATER 200

36 EAST 8TH STREET

DOCS ON THE EDGE: A Student Documentary Showcase from the 2016-2017 Video Production Seminar, Program in Culture & Media

PIXELATING HOLINESS
by Sarah Riccardi-Swartz (Anthropology)
Icons, sacred religious art, are vital to Russian Orthodox religious practice and culture. Traditionally, icons are images of religious figures, such as the saints and Christ, which are hand painted by highly trained artists. In recent years, the method of producing icons has changed to include digitally produced icons. Father Jonah Campbell, an outgoing, spirited priest and family man based in Wayne, West Virginia is leading that change in the American landscape. This documentary wrestles with what happens when the sacred is transformed into megapixels, and ancient forms of religious art are brought into the digital age.
 
CHAINS OF CUSTODY
by Anisha Chadha (Anthropology)
Hundreds of thousands of rape kits have been abandoned and disregarded across the United States. Horrified to learn that her hometown was responsible for a large part of the backlog, filmmaker Anisha Chadha decides to go home to Detroit to inquire more deeply into what rape response in contemporary America looks like. In Chains of Custody she traces how rape kits are processed as they travel through the institutions that survivors contend with when reporting sexual assault.
 
ODE TO FAZIL’S
by Marcel Rosa-Salas (Anthropology)
In a worn-down tenement building on 8th avenue between 46th and 47th street once stood Fazil’s Studio — a rehearsal hall and haven for dance from across the globe. For filmmaker Marcel Rosa-Salas, the daughter of a dancer, Fazil’s was like her second home as a child. Ode to Fazil’s is a personal and collective portrait of this iconic monument in New York City dance history through the materials and memories that live on in the studio’s wake.
 
BACK TO ME
by Zeynep Sertbulut (Anthropology)

In the summer of 2016, following an ISIS airport bombing and a military coup in her home country, Turkish filmmaker Zeynep Sertbulut experienced a temporary psychotic episode for the first time. Now back at graduate school in New York City, she works to come to terms with her significant emotional detour as she tries to recover. Documenting various stages of her recovery, Back to Me is an exploration of identity and change in the midst of conflict as well as the relationships between political events, vulnerability, and personal trauma.

 
Presented by the Department of Anthropology, the Department
of Cinema Studies, and the Program in Culture and Media at

FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 5PM

FRIDAY / APRIL 28 / 5–7 PM

CINEMA STUDIES, MICHELSON THEATER 721 BROADWAY, 6TH FLOOR

I CANNOT TELL YOU HOW I FEEL (41 min, 2016)

THE TIES THAT BIND (55 min, 1985)

Experimental filmmaker Su Friedrich presents her latest documentary, I Cannot Tell You How I Feel, featuring her mother Lore, who protests being taken to an independent living facility, alongside her 1985 film The Ties That Bind, which recorded her mother’s recollections of growing up in Nazi Germany.

CO-SPONSORS: CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF GENDER AND SEXUALITY AND NYU AGING INCUBATOR

FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 3PM

3-5 PM  Traveling to the Ends of the Earth?
NYU Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute
20 Cooper Square, 7th Floor Commons
RSVP TO: cmch.info@nyu.edu
 
Megan Epler Wood (Author, Sustainable Tourism on a Finite Planet; Director, International Sustainable Tourism Initiative, Center for Health and the Global Environment, Harvard School of Public Health), founder in 1990 of The International Ecotourism Society (TIES), will screen an excerpt from her landmark 1991 PBS documentary The Environmental Touristfollowed by a screening of The Venice Syndrome (52 min., 2012, Dir: Andreas Pichler). The Venice Syndrome explores the current state of tourism in Venice, host to 20 million foreigners a year in a city of 58,000 inhabitants. Discussion: Megan Epler Wood and Pegi Vail (Gringo Trails / NYU Center for Media, Culture and History). Moderator: Lynne Minnaert (NYU’s Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism).
Screening is part of GREEN SCREENS: Environmental Ethics On and Off ScreenMarch 23-25 at NYU
 
This showcase was supported by an NYU Green Grant from the Office of Sustainability and a Visual Arts Initiative Award, New York University Arts Council
 
Co-sponsors: NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, Asian/Pacific/American Institute (A/P/A), Center for Latin American and Caribbean (CLACS), Cinema Studies, Environmental Studies, Glucksman Ireland House, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism, Native American, Indigenous Students’ Group (NAISG); and Irish Screen America, NY Wild Film Festival, NY Royal Norwegian Consulate General, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. 

THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 5 PM

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY SPRING 2017 COLLOQUIA

THURSDAY / March 9 / 5-6:30 PM

Silver Center, Room 300, 100 Washington Square East

THE RUSE OF CONSENT AND THE ANATOMY OF “REFUSAL”:
Cases from Indigenous North America and Australia

Lecture by Audra Simpson (Anthropology, Columbia University)

FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 6:30 PM

FRIDAY / MARCH 24 / 6:30 PM
Cantor Film Center,  36 East 8th Street, Theater 200
RSVP TO: cmch.info@nyu.edu
 
 
Screening of the documentary ATLANTIC (80 min., 2016, Dir: Risteard Ó Domhnaill). Narrated by Emmy-award winning actor Brendan Gleeson. The film follows the struggles of three fishing communities in Ireland, Norway and Newfoundland as they battle with the oil explorers and international fishing companies for control of the resources in their waters. Post-screening discussion with Atlantic director Risteard Ó Domhnaill with Jennifer Jacquet (Environmental Studies, NYU). Moderator: Niall McKay (Irish Screen America). Introduction: Pegi Vail (Center for Media, Culture and History)
 
 
Tickets: Event is free and open to the public but seating is limited. First-come, first-served. Doors open fifteen minutes prior to event start time. Please bring photo ID.
Screening is part of GREEN SCREENS: Environmental Ethics On and Off Screen, March 23-25 at NYU
 
Supported by an NYU Green Grant from the Office of Sustainability and a Visual Arts Initiative Award, New York University Arts Council
Co-sponsors: NYU’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute (A/P/A), Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism, Center for Latin American and Caribbean (CLACS), Cinema Studies, Environmental Studies, Glucksman Ireland House, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, Journalism, Native American, Indigenous Students’ Group; and Irish Screen America, NY Wild Film Festival, NY Royal Norwegian Consulate General, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 6PM

THURSDAY/ MARCH 23 / 6 PM
Lipton Hall, NYU Law School
108 West 3rd Street
RSVP TO: cmch.info@nyu.edu
 
 
Screening of the groundbreaking Discovery documentary, SHERPA  (90 min, 2015, Dir: Jennifer Peedom). Mount Everest’s Sherpa community united in grief and anger to reclaim their sacred mountain following the deadly avalanche that struck on April 18, 2014, killing 16 of their members. The project originally began as a documentary about the 2014 climbing season from the Sherpas’ point of view with a focus on legendary Sherpa Phurba Tashi’s world record-breaking attempt to summit Everest for the 22nd time. Instead, they captured the single deadliest day in the mountain’s history. The disaster provoked a drastic reappraisal of the Everest climbing industry, and it served as a turning point for many of the Sherpas and their families as they considered whether to continue working on the mountain.

Post-screening discussion with Sherpa director Jennifer Peedom and Pasang Yangjee Sherpa (Post-Doctoral Fellow for Sacred Landscapes & Sustainable Futures, The New School). Moderator: Angela Zito (NYU Center for Religion and Media). Reception follows discussion.
See trailer
Event is free and open to the public but seating is limited. Please bring photo ID. 

Screening is part of GREEN SCREENS: Environmental Ethics On and Off ScreenMarch 23-25 at NYU
 
Supported by an NYU Green Grant from the Office of Sustainability and a Visual Arts Initiative Award, New York University Arts Council
Co-sponsors: NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, Asian/Pacific/American Institute (A/P/A), Center for Latin American and Caribbean (CLACS), Cinema Studies, Environmental Studies, Glucksman Ireland House, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism, Native American, Indigenous Students’ Group (NAISG); and Irish Screen America, NY Wild Film Festival, NY Royal Norwegian Consulate General, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. 

SATURDAY, MARCH 25

SATURDAY / MARCH 25 / 12-6:30PM
 
INDIGENOUS ACTIVISM IN THE AMERICAS
Cinema Studies, 721 Broadway, 6th Floor, Michelson Theater
RSVP TO: cmch.info@nyu.edu
 
12 -1:30 PMDigital Interventions from Latin America
still_capa_andorinhas1_0
Media selection curated and presented by Amalia Córdova  (Latino Digital Curator, Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage). Still, above: from the film, “Para onde foram as andorinhas?” (Instituto Catitu, Brazil)
 
2-4 PMEnvironmental Justice in North America
Sacred Water_still
Screenings include Sacred Water from the VICE series on Indigenous resistance, Rise by Métis/Algonquin filmmaker Michelle Latimer; and two works by NYU Anthropology PhD students Angelo Baca’s Shash Jaa: Bears Ears (2016) and Teresa Montoya’s Tó Łitso/The Day Our River Ran Yellow (excerpts 2017). Post-screening discussion with Directors Michelle Latimer, Angelo Baca, and Teresa Montoya.
 
4:30-6:30 PM  Screening of Angry Inuk
Screening of the documentary Angry Inuk (2016, 82 min), directed by Inuk filmmaker Alethea Arnaquq-Baril. Though most commercial sealing is conducted by Inuit in the Arctic, anti-sealing activism has created a perception of the industry that denies their central role in the sealskin market. Seal meat is a staple food for Inuit, and many of the pelts are sold to offset the extraordinary cost of hunting. Inuit communities are pushing for a sustainable way to take part in the global economy, but in opposition stands an army of well-funded activists and well-meaning celebrities. Post-screening discussion Director Alethea Arnaquq-Baril (via Skype) with Andrew Okpeaha MacLean (Film & TV, NYU)
 
This showcase was supported by an NYU Green Grant from the Office of Sustainability and a Visual Arts Initiative Award, New York University Arts Council
 
Co-sponsors: NYU’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute (A/P/A), Jonathan M. Tisch Center for Hospitality and Tourism, Center for Latin American and Caribbean (CLACS), Center for Religion and Media, Cinema Studies, Environmental Studies, Glucksman Ireland House, Journalism, Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, and the Native American and Indigenous Students’ Group; with Irish Screen America, NY Wild Film Festival, NY Royal Norwegian Consulate General, and Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.
 
All events are free and open to the public but seats are limited. RSVP TO: cmch.info@nyu.edu
 

MONDAY, MARCH 27, 5–7PM

MONDAY / MARCH 27 / 5–7PM

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY
KRISER SCREENING ROOM
25 WAVERLY PLACE, GROUND FLOOR

RSVP: cmch.info@nyu.edu

THE LAND BENEATH OUR FEET (60 min, 2016, Dirs: Sarita Siegel, Gregg Mitman)

This documentary chronicles a young Liberian man, uprooted by war who returns home with rare 1926 footage of an historic land grab, an explosive reminder of the enduring struggle over land rights. Post-screening discussion with Director Gregg Mitman (Department of Medical History and Bioethics, University of Wisconsin-Madison).

Co-sponsors: Africana Studies, Social and Cultural Analysis; History