ICAL
    • China on Big Screen with NYU CSSA: To Live
    • When: February 28, 2013 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews (China House)
    • Summary: NYU CSSA and NYU China House present “China on Big Screen,” a event that features screening of Chinese film To live, a brief lecture, and authentic Chinese dinner.
    • Michael Forsythe and Henry Sanderson: China’s Superbank and Doing Journalism in China Today
    • When: April 16, 2013 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews (China House)
    • Summary: Michael Forsythe and Henry Sanderson, both at Bloomberg News in Beijing, are the authors recently of the book China’s Superbank: How China Development Bank is Rewriting the Rules of Finance. This talk will be about their new book, and about their many years of being journalists in China. Forsythe & Sanderson broke the story of the family wealth of Xi Jinping, China’s paramount leader.
    • China on Big Screen II with NYU CSSA
    • When: April 18, 2013 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews (China House)
    • Summary: A film screening of The Grand Masters, a film by Hong Kong director Wong Kai Wai and a discussion with professor Dai Jinhua Organized by NYU Chinese Students and Scholars Association
    • China on Big Screen III with NYU CSSA
    • When: April 25, 2013 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews
    • Summary: A film screening of Chinese documentary director Li Xiaofeng and a discussion with Professor Dai Jinhua. Organized by NYU Chinese Students and Scholars Association
    • Liu Zhenyun: Chinese Steamed Roll and Western Bread
    • When: May 3, 2013 12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews (China House)
    • Summary: As a participant of Pen World Voices at NYU this May, renowned Chinese writer Liu Zhenyun is invited by NYU China House to give a lecture, focusing on his view of Chinese and Western culture and literature. The lecture will be conducted in Chinese with English interpretations.
    • Liu Zhenyun: The Gap Between Literature and Reality with Asia Society
    • When: May 7, 2013 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    • Where: Asia Society, 8th Floor
    • Summary: A conversation between Chinese novelist Liu Zhenyun and Zhang Xudong, Chair of the East Asian Studies Department at New York University. The discussion will be moderated by Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director of the Center on U.S. - China Relations at Asia Society
    • Back to 1942: Film Screening with Liu Zhenyun
    • When: May 10, 2013 6:30 pm - 10:00 pm
    • Where: 19 W 4 Street, Room 101
    • Summary: As a part of his visit to New York this May, renowned Chinese writer Liu Zhenyun will present film Back to 1942, adapted based on his novella Remembering 1942 followed by a panel discussion with Tisch professor Zhang Zhen and professor Dai Jinhua, moderated by China House Director Zhang Xudong.
    • HuAnyang Visits NYU
    • When: October 22, 2013
    • Where:
    • Summary: Hu Angang was born in 1953. He is one of the pioneers and leading authorities in the realm of Contemporary China Studies. He now serves as the Dean of the Institute of Contemporary China Studies at Tsinghua University and Professor of School of Public Policy and Management of Tsinghua University. He is also a member of the Advisory Committee for the Twelfth Five-Year Plan under NDRC, a member of the Advisory Committee of the National Disaster Mitigation Committee and a member of the Advisory Committee of Beijing Municipal Government.
    • Zhiyuan Cui:Understanding Xi JinPing’s Grand Refrom Strategy
    • When: April 10, 2014 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
    • Where: China House, 8 Washington Mews
    • Summary: In the recent Third Plenum of the 18th CCP Party Congress, Xi proposed a 60-points comprehensive reform plan. It is subject to competing interpretations within China and abroad.The lecture will propose an interpretation based on the examination of the latest reforms in three areas: state-owned enterprises, rural land trust, and party-state relationship.
    • Contemporary Chinese Ink Art Since 1980s
    • When: November 7, 2014 - November 10, 2014
    • Where: Long Island Nassau County Gov Building, 1550 Franklin Ave, Mineola, NY 11501
    • Summary: Curated by Shanghai Himalayas Museum, the exhibition intends to probe into development of Chinese ink art during the past three decades.
    • MoYan Visits NYU China House
    • When: November 9, 2014
    • Where: NYU China House
    • Summary: On November 9, Nobel laureate in literature (2012) Mo Yan visited NYU China House and held informal conversations with faculty, graduate students, and visiting scholars working modern Chinese Literature.
    • Chinese Chess Champions Xie Jun and Dang Fei Visit NYU
    • When: December 16, 2014 10:30 am - 12:30 pm
    • Where: NYU Kimmel Center, Room 405
    • Summary: The World Chinese Chess Association gave a lecture on XiangQi and International Chess. The lecture took place at 10:30am, Tuesday, December 16 at NYU Kimmel Center Room 405. The audience had the opportunity to play chess game with chess master Xie Jun and Dang Fei.
    • The New Normal of Chinese Economy
    • When: February 3, 2015 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
    • Where: Kimmel Center, Room 914
    • Summary: A luncheon lecture with Yongding Yu, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. YU Yongding an Academician of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS), member of the Advisory Committee of National Planning of the National Development and Reform Committee of the PRC; member of National People’s Political Consultative Conference (NPPCC); and member of Committee of Foreign Affairs of (NPPCC). He was Director-General of Institute of World Economics and Politics (IWEP) with the CASS (1998-2009), President of China Society of World Economy (2003- 2009), and Member of the Monetary Policy Committee of the People’s Bank of China (2004-2006); member of the Advisory Committee of Foreign Policy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the PRC. Yu Yongding was born in 1948. . . .
    • Happy the Year of Goat: 2015 Chinese New Year Celebration
    • When: February 18, 2015 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm
    • Where: 19 University Pl, Ground Floor, The Great Room
    • Summary: Come and join us in celebrating Lunar New Year. Visit our cultural booths such as paper-cutting, lantern riddles solving, calligraphy, Chinese knot weaving, dumpling making,, traditional costumes dressing, chopstick competition, Chinese folk dance demonstration, and win prizes!
    • Laurence J. Brahm: Fusion Economics: China and the Himalayan Consensus
    • When: March 24, 2015 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
    • Where: NYU Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Square, Room 909
    • Summary: Laurence Brahm is a lawyer, political-economist and author. His work in China spans three decades. He has written over thirty books on China’s economic reforms, Asian finance, and sustainable development (including China’s Century, and Zhu Rongji). He is a member of the United Nations Theme Group on Poverty and Inequality.
    • China House & APA Open House
    • When: September 4, 2015 12:00 pm - October 4, 2015 3:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: New York University China House seeks to seize upon the enormous intellectual and scholarly potential that lies in modern China and to advance the study of the dynamic changes taking place in China through joint dialogue and research. ** A/P/A Institute works to dispel socio-cultural and political misconceptions, provide cultural and scholarly connections, lead collections building, and encourage innovative research and interdisciplinary exploration.
    • Professor. Qin Shao on “Re-Urbanizing Shanghai: Domicide and Its Impact”
    • When: October 8, 2015 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    • Where: Exihibition Room at 8 Washington Mews
    • Summary: NYU Department of History and NYU China House jointly present Qin Shao, Professor of History at the College of New Jersey on "Re-Urbanizing Shanghai: Domicide and Its Impact", a lecture based upon Prof. Shao's book, Gone Shanghai: Domicide and Defiance in a Chinese Megacity (2013).
    • Lu Xun & Nihilism in Modern Chinese Literature
    • When: October 21, 2015 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
    • Where: 7 East 12th Street, Room LL27
    • Summary: The origins of modern Chinese literature, as is commonly recognized, are closely correlated to the larger cultural-political agenda of reforming and modernizing Chinese society. The works of Lun Xun, arguably the most important founding figure of Chinese literary modernity, probably offer the most convincing evidence in this regard. Dr. Wenjin Cui argues, however, that, at the core of his writings, lies a dark, profound nihilistic anguish. Interestingly, more than simply a pessimistic attitude toward the external world, this nihilistic trait is part of a fundamental assertion of the internal negativity of his own self. Through a close reading of several of Lu Xun's key texts, Dr. Cui hopes to show how, at the very heart of the modern Chinese literary tradition, Lu Xun's unflinching gaze into the dark nothingness of his own existence gives rise to an essential recognition of a freedom from which there is no escape and an affirmation of life that refuses to subjugate itself to pure nihilism.
    • Chinese Folk Dance Workshop Part I
    • When: October 23, 2015 10:00 am - 11:30 am
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: [Theme: Classical Chinese Dance, Fundamentals of Classical Chinese Dance Body Rhythm-Shen Yun] Chinese dance is one of the most unique regional dances in the world. It has its own dance vocabulary, meanings, and ordered structures that enable dancers to express their thoughts and feelings with grace and power. This workshop offers a great opportunity to dance-lovers and people who are interested in Chinese art to taste the uniqueness of Chinese dance, and to develop a deeper understanding of Chinese artistic features and aesthetics that is embodied in it. Within the four sessions, participants will learn about the origin and development of Chinese dance, the basic elements in Chinese classical dances and dances of various ethnic groups in China through lectures and hands-on experience. Each session will be divided into two parts. The first half an hour is a lecture on one type of dance. In the next hour, participants will experience the dance by doing basic movements following the instructor’s demonstration.
    • Chinese Folk Dance Workshop Part II
    • When: November 6, 2015 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: [Theme: Chinese Folk Dance, Fan Dance-Shanzi Wu] Chinese dance is one of the most unique regional dances in the world. It has its own dance vocabulary, meanings, and ordered structures that enable dancers to express their thoughts and feelings with grace and power. This workshop offers a great opportunity to dance-lovers and people who are interested in Chinese art to taste the uniqueness of Chinese dance, and to develop a deeper understanding of Chinese artistic features and aesthetics that is embodied in it. Within the four sessions, participants will learn about the origin and development of Chinese dance, the basic elements in Chinese classical dances and dances of various ethnic groups in China through lectures and hands-on experience. Each session will be divided into two parts. The first half an hour is a lecture on one type of dance. In the next hour, participants will experience the dance by doing basic movements following the instructor’s demonstration.
    • The First Annual Chinese Language Speech Competition
    • When: November 6, 2015 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: The Department of East Asian Studies and China House will be hosting the First Annual Chinese Language Speech Competition. To apply, you must be an NYU EAS Major or Minor.
    • Chinese Folk Dance Workshop Part III
    • When: November 13, 2015 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: [Theme: Folk Dances of Ethnic Minorities in China I, Dance of Uygur Ethnic Group- Xin Jiang Wu] Chinese dance is one of the most unique regional dances in the world. It has its own dance vocabulary, meanings, and ordered structures that enable dancers to express their thoughts and feelings with grace and power. This workshop offers a great opportunity to dance-lovers and people who are interested in Chinese art to taste the uniqueness of Chinese dance, and to develop a deeper understanding of Chinese artistic features and aesthetics that is embodied in it. Within the four sessions, participants will learn about the origin and development of Chinese dance, the basic elements in Chinese classical dances and dances of various ethnic groups in China through lectures and hands-on experience. Each session will be divided into two parts. The first half an hour is a lecture on one type of dance. In the next hour, participants will experience the dance by doing basic movements following the instructor’s demonstration.
    • Chinese Folk Dance Workshop Part IV
    • When: November 20, 2015 10:30 am - 12:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: [Theme: Folk Dances of Ethnic Minorities in China II, Dance of Dai Ethnic Group- Dai Zu Wu] Chinese dance is one of the most unique regional dances in the world. It has its own dance vocabulary, meanings, and ordered structures that enable dancers to express their thoughts and feelings with grace and power. This workshop offers a great opportunity to dance-lovers and people who are interested in Chinese art to taste the uniqueness of Chinese dance, and to develop a deeper understanding of Chinese artistic features and aesthetics that is embodied in it. Within the four sessions, participants will learn about the origin and development of Chinese dance, the basic elements in Chinese classical dances and dances of various ethnic groups in China through lectures and hands-on experience. Each session will be divided into two parts. The first half an hour is a lecture on one type of dance. In the next hour, participants will experience the dance by doing basic movements following the instructor’s demonstration.
    • China’s New Culture Movement, 100 Years Later
    • When: November 23, 2015 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Youth Magazine (later renamed New Youth), which ushered in the New Culture Movement, an intellectual and cultural movement that would forever change the cultural landscape of Modern China. The discussions of the New Culture Movement have gone through a complex and convoluted history, with a discursive domain ranging from the differentiation of the new and the old, to appeals for a scientific and democratic enlightenment, to the balancing of the cultural relationship between China and the West. Professor Ouyang Zhesheng’s talk will subject to critical examination various discourses on the New Culture Movement. He argues for the need to have a more rational, open-minded and inclusive understanding of this pivotal historical event and the necessity for Chinese civilization to negotiate between Chinese and Western culture on its path forward.
    • Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop Series on Anyi Wang & Chinese Realism
    • When: February 11, 2016 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews, NYU China House
    • Summary: The first of our bi-weekly workshops will focus on Wang Anyi's early works, from the period of 1978-1981. Group discussion in this initial meeting will be generally focused around questions of Chinese realism in Wang's short fiction. How do her works negotiate a new kind of realist aesthetic in these early years of the Deng Xiaoping era, and how might they have set the stage for subsequent expressions of realism? The general nature of our discussion will also allow us to touch upon related topics, such as urban literature and women's writing.
    • BALLET IN CHINA: FROM SWAN LAKE TO “RED” BALLET
    • When: February 22, 2016 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
    • Where: NYU Center for Ballet & the Arts - 16 Cooper Square New York, NY 10003
    • Summary: Ballet saw its formal induction into the land of dragons in 1954, 5 years after the founding of the People’s Republic of China, and its history has closely traced the latter ever since. Part of a sweeping nation-building effort, ballet took on socio-historical urgency unique to the young republic. Reflective of the country’s ideological alliance with the then Soviet Union, the early form of Chinese ballet was essentially that of Chinese dancers dancing Soviet ballet, as was typified in the country’s first stage production of Swan Lake in 1958. However, just as quickly as Sino-Soviet alliance started to unwind, Chinese ballet soon found itself compelled to adept to new cultural-political demands of the day and started experimenting with new elements adopted from non-Russian ballet sources, as well as China’s own tradition, culminating in the 1964 stage production of “The Red Detachment of Women,” which to this day remains arguably the most popular and successful Chinese ballet production at home and abroad. With the country undergoing radical transformation in the past 3 decades, Chinese ballet artists are again endeavoring to both educate Chinese audience, to whom ballet largely remains an alien art form, and respond to the changing aesthetic taste and need. Mme. Ying Feng will speak on the unique challenge Chinese ballet artists face in staying true to the great tradition of ballet while at the same time fashioning a new artistic identity for themselves, a challenge no less compelling today than it was 50 years ago.
    • Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop on Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism – From City to Country And Back
    • When: February 25, 2016 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 19 University Pl. Room 222
    • Summary: By invitation only, please contact Todd Foley at twf218@nyu.edu if you'd like to participate. A major presence across the whole of modern Chinese literature, the relationship between the country and the city is also one that Wang Anyi persistently explores throughout her oeuvre. Encompassing a number of other thematic binaries, such as agrarian/industrial, tradition/modernity, and local/global, as well as issues of language, displacement, and social hierarchy, this general theme will allow us to open up a variety of different avenues for discussion. By focusing on several of Wang’s short stories from the 1980s, furthermore, we will examine specific articulations of these problematics at a particular literary historical juncture.
    • A Reading with Wang Anyi
    • When: February 26, 2016 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: Meyer Hall 4 Washington Pl Room 212
    • Summary: NYU China House proudly presents A Reading with Wang Anyi and Andrea Lingenfelter
    • Study Abroad Info Session
    • When: March 3, 2016 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
    • Where: NYU China House, 8 Washington Mews
    • Summary: Join the Department of East Asian Studies, NYU China House, NYU Global Programs, and NYU Shanghai for a study abroad panel discussion followed by a student meet and greet reception. Learn more about study abroad opportunities and meet students who have studied away.
    • Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop on Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism – The Realist Encounter with Socialist Modernity
    • When: March 10, 2016 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: By invitation only, please contact Todd Foley at twf218@nyu.edu if you'd like to participate. How might we understand Wang Anyi’s writings in relation to both the previously dominant mode of socialist realism and the experimental, avant-garde writings of the post-Mao era? How do Wang’s expressions of objective and subjective realities articulate a particular sort of realism in response to socialist modernity, and how does this realism intersect with post-Mao literary movements such as scar literature, searching-for-roots literature, new realism, and avant-garde literature?
    • “China’s Van Gogh” Screening and Discussion
    • When: March 22, 2016 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
    • Where: NYU Meyer Hall Room 122, 4 Washington Place
    • Summary: Screening of a rough cut of the film and discussion with producer and co-director Kiki Tianqi Yu, moderated by Prof. Zhen Zhang, Director of Asian Film and Media Initiative (Cinema Studies).
    • Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop on Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism – Literary Representation of Urban Space
    • When: March 24, 2016 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 19 University Pl. Room 222
    • Summary: By invitation only, please contact Todd Foley at twf218@nyu.edu if you'd like to participate. The city of Shanghai features prominently in Wang Anyi’s works, which are renowned for their vivid depictions of life in one of China’s most distinctive metropolises. In this session we will discuss the specific ways in which Wang portrays this urban space. How, for instance, do Wang’s writings link the local, quotidian details of Shanghainese life to the notion of Shanghai as the center of Chinese cosmopolitanism? Our examination will also continue to draw upon previous threads of discussion, including realism, socialist modernity, and urban/rural exchange.
    • Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop on Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism – Women and Chinese Realism
    • When: April 7, 2016 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: By invitation only, please contact Todd Foley at twf218@nyu.edu if you'd like to participate. In a field that continues to be characterized by a predominance of male authors, Wang Anyi stands out as a prominent and established female voice. In this session we will examine the ways that Wang gives expression to a distinctly feminine writing and subjectivity. Can we come to certain understandings of her style of realism by approaching it as gendered? How do her works intersect with those of other contemporary female authors, and to what extent might they participate in or contribute towards a feminist realism?
    • Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop on Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism – The Great Cultural Revolution and Its Literary Representation
    • When: April 21, 2016 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: By invitation only, please contact Todd Foley at twf218@nyu.edu if you'd like to participate. From Wang Anyi’s earliest stories to her more recent novels, the Cultural Revolution has remained a recurring presence in Wang’s literary realism. Whether depicting the time period itself or the years that followed, her works treat the subject in a subtle way that explores the complexities of life in this very particular historical setting. Our discussion for this session will explore the specific character of Wang’s literary representations of the Cultural Revolution, which will also allow us to revisit previous topics of femininity, urban space, socialist modernity, and realism from a new perspective.
    • A Garden Not Enclosed — The Jia Family Identity and Legal Status in the Honglou Meng
    • When: May 3, 2016 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: Andrew Plaks is Professor of East Asian Studies at Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He was Professor of East Asian Studies and Comparative Literature at Princeton University until his retirement in 2007. He is an internationally recognized authority on Classical Chinese literature. His major works include Archetype and Allegory in the Dream of the Red Chamber, The Four Masterworks of the Ming Novel (winner of 1989 Joseph Levenson Book Prize), The Highest Order of Cultivation and On the Practice of the Mean, etc. As in the Biblical Song of Songs, the "enclosed garden" of the Daguanyuan in Honglou meng serves as a symbolic construct signifying a self-contained world of virginal purity and innocence. But in the course of the novel the walls of this inviolable space are breached in a number of ways: both from within, through the psycho-social dynamics of human interaction, and from without, by the forces of power and corruption of the "real" world outside its gates. Together with its primary literary model Jin Ping Mei, Honglou meng presents an essentially imaginary world that occasionally provides a surprisingly accurate reflection of certain details of the social and economic history of, respectively, the Wan-li and Qianlong periods. In the latter case, this has much to do with the largely autobiographical, confessional impulse informing the composition of the fictional text, but it is also grounded in the novel's basic mimetic stance of verisimilitude, within which even the more anti-realistic aspects of the narrative are anchored in a recognizable frame of contemporary reality.
    • Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop on Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism – Realism and the Historical Novel
    • When: May 5, 2016 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: By invitation only, please contact Todd Foley at twf218@nyu.edu if you'd like to participate. Loosely following from the previous session’s discussion, in this meeting we will interrogate the roles that history plays in Wang Anyi’s writings. How do Wang’s works both capture the past and display it as part of a living present? Do different time periods appear to play different roles, and do we notice any ways in which her portrayal of history has changed during her career? Our general discussion may touch upon these and other questions to examine the ways in which we might view Wang’s writing as a kind of historical realism.
    • Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism
    • When: May 6, 2016 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
    • Where: 238 Thompson Street, Room 461 (GC461), New York, New York 10012
    • Summary: Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism. This Event is Open to the Public.
    • Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop on Wang Anyi and Chinese Realism – Chinese Realism in Historical and Global Contexts
    • When: May 19, 2016 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 8 Washington Mews Gallery
    • Summary: By invitation only, please contact Todd Foley at twf218@nyu.edu if you'd like to participate. In this final session of our semester-long workshop series, we will continue discussion of specific works while also opening up a more holistic view of Wang Anyi’s oeuvre. What do we see as the relationships between her writings and the broader history of Chinese realism? How might we position her literary productions in a global context? Issues discussed in previous sessions might also provide various angles for approaching these broader questions.
    • Study Away Info Session
    • When: September 15, 2016 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
    • Where: China House Gallery - 8 Washington Mews, New York
    • Summary: Learn more about study away opportunities at NYU. Presentations by NYU Global, NYU Shanghai, & NYU Abu Dhabi. Food & drinks will be provided after the presentations. Undergraduates only.
    • The Age of Irreverence: A New History of Laughter in China
    • When: September 21, 2016 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    • Where: China House Gallery - 8 Washington Mews, New York
    • Summary: China's entry into modernity was not just traumatic, but uproarious. As the Qing dynasty fell at the turn of the 20th century, prominent writers compiled jokes to form collections called “histories of laughter.” In the first years of the Republic (1911 onwards), novelists, essayists, and illustrators used humorous allegories to make veiled critiques of the new government. Yet political and cultural discussion repeatedly erupted into invective, with critics gleefully jeering rivals in public. Farceurs drew followings in the popular press, promoting a culture of buffoonery. These expressions of hilarity proved so offensive to high-brow writers that they launched a campaign in the 1930s to displace old forms of mirth with a new one they called youmo (humor). What can we learn about history from those who laugh their way through it? Focusing on the case of China, this talk will discuss how political turmoil, new media, and other forces nurtured cultures of humor in a modernizing society, from the last days of empire to the digital age.
    • Art and China After 1989: New Perspectives
    • When: September 30, 2016 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
    • Where: 239 Greene Street, floor 8
    • Summary: An emerging scholars symposium co-organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the NYU Department of Media, Culture, and Communication. Examining key artists, groups, and movements active across mainland China and internationally whose visual and conceptual investigations reflect particular concerns among artists during the reform era: how to forge reality free from ideology, how to establish the individual apart from the collective polity, and how to define contemporary Chinese experience in universal terms.
    • Internship Info Session
    • When: October 13, 2016 4:30 pm - 6:30 pm
    • Where: China House Gallery - 8 Washington Mews, New York
    • Summary: Presentations by Japan Society, Asia Art Archive in America, & The China Institute. Food & drinks will be provided. Undergraduates only.
    • Le Reve Chinois – China: From Imperial Subjugation to Hubris
    • When: October 20, 2016 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: China House Gallery - 8 Washington Mews, New York
    • Summary: If we examine a cycle of 17 decades, from 1842 to the present, it encompasses the end of the first Opium War, the Nanjing “unequal treaty”, the historic re-emergence of China in 1949 and the subsequent metamorphosis into the “Open Door” era and beyond. Here, a crucial transformation, almost a mutation, can be found. China has moved dynamically from a situation of almost total imperial subjugation to a state of impressive self-assertiveness, of accentuated hubris and even arrogance. An attempt will be made here to examine that mutation and analyze China's role in the international arena today.
    • China & Israel: Strange Bedfellows
    • When: October 26, 2016 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: China House Gallery - 8 Washington Mews, New York
    • Summary: The Sino-Israeli story is a most thrilling story. It encompasses unique history, culture, complex diplomacy and worldwide business. This is undoubtedly a success story. An attempt will be made here to feature the wide picture of Sino-Israeli relations from a historical-political perspective, from Jewish-Israeli standpoint and from the author's personal stance. The speaker will devote special place to Israeli companies active in China, to the reasons for their respective successes and failures and to Chinese current high-tech, innovation and infra-structural investments in Israel with a special emphasis on contradictory viewpoints regarding this new trend.
    • Reel China@NYU 8th Biennial 2016
    • When: October 28, 2016 2:30 pm - October 30, 2016 4:30 pm
    • Where: 721 Broadway, Room 648 (Michelson Theater), Tisch School of the Arts, New York University
    • Summary: Reel China 2016 once again samples outstanding contemporary Chinese independent documentaries, while also showcasing a number of innovative narrative, experimental films and animation works. These films use different kinds of media or technology and are by emerging filmmakers in China (with, in some instances, non-Chinese collaborators). Many of them are award-winning films from the China Independent Film Festival (CIFF) in Nanjing and elsewhere. CIFF also contributes a special shorts program for this Reel China edition. Participating filmmakers range from more experienced ones to young novices. As their disparate visions and voices extend and overlap, we witness the persistent presence of independent perspectives that assure the discovery and creative engagement of the disorienting contemporary social and psychic fragments that are becoming history at breakneck speed.
    • China-US Forum at NYU: A Conversation with Madame Fu Ying
    • When: December 1, 2016 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
    • Where: NYU Law School Tischman Auditorium 40 Washington Square South New York, NY 10012
    • Summary: Madame Fu Ying, Chairperson of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the National People’s Congress of China, is among the highest ranking women in Chinese government, and only the second woman to serve this role. She will speak on China-US relations and the place of China in the world, and then engage in a wide-ranging conversation with Jeffrey Lehman, Vice Chancellor of NYU Shanghai, and former diplomat Stapleton Roy. This event is organized by the Institute for Public Knowledge and the office of the Vice Provost for Faculty, Arts, Humanities, and Diversity at NYU, in collaboration with the China-U.S. Exchange Foundation.
    • Chinese New Year Celebration
    • When: January 30, 2017 11:00 am - 2:00 pm
    • Where: Kimmel 914
    • Summary: Celebrate the year of the rooster with NYU Chinese Language Lecturers, NYU China House, and Alpha Kappa Delta Phi Sorority. There will be cultural booths and live performances: Chinese flute solo, Chinese folk dance, vocal ensemble, games, & prizes.
    • Mr. No Problem Screening
    • When: February 10, 2017 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm
    • Where: 19 University Place, Room 102
    • Summary: Feng Mei is an award winning screenwriter turned film director. His filmography includes Mr. No Problem (2016), Mystery (2012), Spring Fever (2009) and Summer Palace (2006). His directorial debut, Mr. No Problem, won the 2016 Tokyo International Film Festival Award for Best Artistic Contribution and the 2016 Taiwai Golden Horse Film Festival Awards for Best Screen Script and Best Actor. In 2009, his screen play for Spring Fever won the Best Screen Play Award at the Cannes International Film Festival. Other awards he received include 2013 Asian Film Awards for Best Screenwriter and 2012 China Independent Film Festive for Best Film. In addition to his screenwriting and directing endeavors, Mei is an Associate Professor at Beijing Film Academy. Director Q&A will follow the screening.
    • A Reading by Jin Yucheng, Shanghai in Blossom
    • When: February 28, 2017 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
    • Where: NYU China House Gallery, 8 Washington Mews, New York, NY 10003
    • Summary: A Reading by Jin Yucheng, 'Shanghai in Blossom 繁花'—Jin Yucheng 金宇澄 is a Chinese novelist, best known for his novel Blossoms which won the Mao Dun Literary Prize (2015) -- one of most prestigious literature prizes in China.
    • Representation of City in Modern Chinese Literature
    • When: March 2, 2017 10:00 am - 8:30 pm
    • Where: TBD
    • Summary: A Workshop with the Shanghai Writers Delegation: Jin Yucheng, Mao Jian, Ni Wenjian. This event is invitation only and is not open to the public.
    • Someone To Talk To (一句顶一万句): A Screening and Discussion with Writer Liu Zhenyun and Director Liu Yulin
    • When: September 14, 2017 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
    • Where: 19 University Place New York, NY 10003 (Room 102)
    • Summary: On September 14, NYU China House and China Institute will present a screening of Someone to Talk To (一句顶一万句), directed by Liu Yulin with a screenplay by Liu Zhenyun (刘震云). Following the screening both Liu Yulin and Liu Zhenyun will take part in a discussion and Q&A with NYU China House Director Zhang Xudong about the film and Liu Zhenyun’s work as a writer.
    • Movie Screening: “The Conformist”
    • When: September 21, 2017 6:30 pm - 9:30 pm
    • Where: 19 University Place, Room 102 (Ground Floor) New York, NY 10003
    • Summary: Join NYU China House and Beijing Contemporary Art Foundation on September 21 for an exclusive screening of "The Conformist", an award-winning film directed by Cai Shangjun (蔡尚君) and a Q&A session afterwards.
Events occur at New York (UTC - 4) local time.