Professor Chow Receives Prestigious NSF Award

Joseph Chow is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award, entitled “CAREER: Urban Transport Network Design with Privacy-Aware Agent Learning”. The goal is to integrate research and teaching to culminate in a test bed in New York City that is expected to shape a next-generation national interdisciplinary research center on “smart transit” over the next decade.

The NYU Press Release can be found at NYU News and Publications

The abstract of the grant topic is available here.

BUILT to present research at the 21st Conference of the IFORS

Diego Correa will be presenting on the topic “Data-driven spatial-temporal dynamic equilibrium matching models of welfare effects from New York City taxi and Uber markets” in a session on Transport Economics and Operation in the Traffic Flow Theory and Control stream at the 21st Triennial conference on “OR/Analytics for a better world” to be held between July 17-21, 2017 in Quebec City, Canada. This work is under joint supervision of Professors Joseph Chow and Kaan Ozbay.

They conduct an empirical study to find the relationship between the built environment, service supply, and user demand by time of day for Uber using a spatial dynamic equilibrium taxi matching model. Given a matching friction, a spatial distribution of demand activities, and service coverage, the model outputs equilibrium fleet sizes, matches, and social welfare by zone and time of day.

The International Federation of Operational Research Societies (IFORS) is an umbrella organization for national operations research societies of over 45 countries from four geographical regions: Asia-Pacific, Europe, North America, and South America. IFORS conferences are triennial memorable events. IFORS 2017 will bring together operational researchers from around the globe.

 Learn more about: Joseph ChowKaan Ozbay, Diego Correa.

BUILT study to be presented at ISTTT22

Prof. Chow’s recent joint work with researchers at University of Maryland (led there by Prof. Paul Schonfeld), was accepted for publication and selected as one of 36 lectern presentations (out of over 300 initial submissions) at ISTTT 22, one of the most prestigious transportation symposiums in the world (their website: http://sites.northwestern.edu/isttt/). The paper’s title is “Stochastic dynamic switching in fixed and flexible transit services as market entry-exit real options”, with one application to enable stochastic control of autonomous vehicle fleets like NEXT (http://www.next-future-mobility.com/) to know when to couple and decouple vehicles in motion based on real-time data.

BUILT study on autonomous vehicle fleets referenced in The Village Voice

Stephen Miller published an article “Instead of Building De Blasio’s Streetcar, What If We Had Self-Driving Uber Vans” in The Village Voice. The article was a discussion focusing on the Brooklyn-Queens (BQX) streetcar, and the feasibility of replacing it with a fleet of self-driving, on-demand vans. The BUILT study developed an event-based simulation model to compare the performance of shared autonomous vehicle system against light rail system under the same demand patterns, route alignment, and operating speeds. The study was presented at the 96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board on January 11th, 2017 in Washington, D.C., and will be published in the Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board.

A pre-print of the paper can be found here: 

Simulation experiment to compare light rail streetcar against shared autonomous vehicle fleet for Brooklyn Queens Connector

Presentation at the 96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board (1/8/17-1/12/17)

Congratulation to BUILT summer researcher – Lucas Mestres Mendes, NYU graduate student – Manel Rivera Bennassar,  and Professor Joseph Chow, whose paper was accepted for presentation at the  96th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, and that it is under review for publication in Transportation Research Record.

Find more detail: 

Simulation experiment to compare light rail streetcar against shared autonomous vehicle fleet for Brooklyn Queens Connector

ARISE 2016 Colloquium

The NYU Tandon School of Engineering conducts the Applied Research Innovations in Science and Engineering (ARISE) program since summer 2013. We had two ARISE participants this summer, Malaq Alzoubeir and Kathy Sze Ting Lau, who have spent the past five weeks to make practical contributions to our lab’s research objectives.  Congratulations to Malaq and Kathy. They both gave brilliant presentations at the program’s concluding colloquium.

 

arise