Category: Faculty Research

DACA-mented, Undocumented, and Temporary Protected Status Students and Allies

Without congressional action, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program will expire on March 5, 2018.  We do not know what the results of congressional debate will be for DACA or how these will influence other immigration issues and statuses.  The Anthropology Department’s goal is to support you during this uncertain time NYU will continue to support undocumented students, staff and faculty. If you are or someone close to you is undocumented or have DACA or temporary protected status, please know that there are many things you can do before March.  The following link provides practical steps you can take as well as connections to NYU immigrant defense initiative which can help with legal advice and referrals (http://as.nyu.edu/anthropology/undergraduate/resources/daca-students.html). NYU provides additional information and resources for students here.  We want to remind you during these disconcerting times that you are a valued member of our community.

Alex DeCasien’s Research Garners Media Attention

Congratulations to Ph.D candidate Alex DeCasien! Her 2nd year qualification paper was recently published, with Professors James Higham and Scott Williams as co-authors. The paper’s research found that “those [non human primates] who munched on fruit instead of leaves had 25 percent more brain tissue, even when controlling for body size and species relatedness” (NPR).

The research generated quite a bit of media attention in publications including Science, the BBC, Scientific American, New Scientist, The Guardian, and The Smithsonian.

Data Rescue Event a Massive Success

On Saturday, February 4th, 2017, several students from the Department led by Professor Jerome Whitington, participated in a Data Rescue event designed to archive and protect several websites on climate change, environmental data, and energy usage that could be threatened by our current Trump administration. Below is a statement from Professor Whitington detailing the success of the event:

“[The event] went off extremely well – about 160 people were involved, we archived a lot of federal websites and data especially from the Dept of Energy and Dept of Interior, and some other important work as well.It’s pretty heartening to see so many people engaged with environmental information and regulatory systems to such a degree of detail. Notably, we hosted a meeting among some key librarians around the country. It seems university librarians have been discussing a plan to systematically archive government data for about two decades, and some work has been done but there has never been a push to actually get it running. Due to the popular demand for this, there is now a movement for big libraries to create trusted data reserves linked in with their indexing systems. If this comes online it will be a very big win for us.”

The event was also covered extensively in the press. You can read articles about it here, here, here, and here.

Anthropologists Uncover 38,000 Year-Old Engravings

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“An international team of anthropologists has uncovered a 38,000-year-old engraved image in a southwestern French rockshelter—a finding that marks some of the earliest known graphic imagery found in Western Eurasia.” Professor Randall White, of the NYU Department of Anthropology and the Center for the Study of Human Origins, contributed to the findings. You can read more about the discoveries, here.

Celebrating Sonia Das’ Book Release!

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The Department of Anthropology is thrilled to congratulate Professor Sonia Das on the release of her new monograph entitled Linguistic Rivalries: Tamil Migrants and Anglo-Franco Conflicts published by Oxford University Press. Please read more about Sonia and her book here. \

Congratulations, Sonia!

Faye Ginsburg and Rayna Rapp on Disability and the Election

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#cripthevote T-shirt. Photo courtesy of the Disability Visiblity Project.

Professor Faye Ginsburg and Professor Rayna Rapp contributed to the online HotSpots section of the journal Cultural Anthropology, commenting on the interplay of disability and politics in the 2016 US Presidential Election. The piece can be read in full here and provides an illuminating examination of the ways disability has been talked about and represented during this unprecedented election season.

Congratulations to Faye and Rayna!