We had a great turn out for the year one kick-off.  Thanks to all who presented, attended, and engaged in Q&A.

Chris Leslie started us off with an overview of the research collaborative.

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Chris’s full presentation: humanities-kickoff

Deena Engel, Clinical Professor in the Courant Institute’s Department of Computer Science, described the ways she’s partnered with professors in humanities courses and archivists in “Three Approaches to Archives and Pedagogy.”  Her presentation provided links to syllabi and sample websites.

Sample site created in Practicum in Digital Humanities, a graduate course co-taught by Deena Engel (Computer Science) and Marion Thain (Liberal Studies and English)

Sample site created in Practicum in Digital Humanities, a graduate course co-taught by Deena Engel (Computer Science) and Marion Thain (Liberal Studies and English)

Deena’s full presentation: engel_humanitiesforstem_v3

 

Lindsay Anderberg talked about her work with archives in undergraduate engineering courses in  “Archival Interventions with Engineering Undergraduates.”

Examples of materials from the Poly Archives used with Tandon School of Engineering undergraduates.

Examples of materials from the Poly Archives used with Tandon School of Engineering undergraduates.

Lindsay’s full presentation: anderberg_archival-interventions-with-engineering-undergraduates-1    humanities-for-stem-kick-off-presentation (written notes to go with slides)

 

Bell Labs Archivist, Ed Eckert, presented, “The Bell Labs Archives – An Overview of Operations and Services of a Corporate Archives.” He outlined the scope and content of the Bell Labs Archives and discussed the challenges and benefits particular to corporate archives.

The Nokia Bell Labs exhibition space in Murray Hill, New Jersey. Highlighted Bell Labs innovations on display include the first transistor and the Telstar satellite.

The Nokia Bell Labs exhibition space in Murray Hill, New Jersey. Highlighted Bell Labs innovations on display include the first transistor and the Telstar satellite.

Ed’s full presentation: nokia-bell-labs-archives

 

Lisa Gitelman, Professor of Media and English at NYU Steinhardt and the College of Arts and Science, talked about her work as a researcher with the Thomas A. Edison Papers, which were minimally processed at the time.  Archivists are familiar with the challenges of an unprocessed collection, but may not always think about the unknowns that could pop up in science archives, like a radioactive scare caused by a packet of powder (upon further research, it turned out to be a false alarm).

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These presentations set the stage for our research collaborative as we embark on the first year of research, archives visits, and pedagogical inquiry.

Interested in learning more?  Check out the reading list below and continue to follow along with us on this blog.

 


Reading List

Anderberg, L. (2014). SOUP and symmetry: Physics majors explore an archival  collection. Metropolitan Archivist, 20(1), 10–11. http://www.nycarchivists.org/resources/documents/Metropolitan_Archivist_Vol20_No1.pdf

Anderberg, L. (2015). STEM undergraduates and archival instruction: A case study at NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering. The American Archivist, 78(2), 548–566. http://doi.org/10.17723/0360-9081.78.2.548

Bunde, J., & Engel, D. (2010). Computing in the humanities: An interdisciplinary partnership in undergraduate education. Journal of Archival Organization, 8(2), 149–159. http://doi.org/10.1080/15332748.2010.519993

Engel, D., & Thain, M. (2015). Textual artifacts and their digital representations: Teaching graduate students to build online archives, 9(1). Retrieved from http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/9/1/000199/000199.html

Engel, D., & Wharton, G. (2014). Reading between the lines: Source code documentation as a conservation strategy for software-based art. Studies in Conservation, 59(6), 404–415. http://doi.org/10.1179/2047058413Y.0000000115

Gitelman, L. (2000). Scripts, grooves, and writing machines: Representing technology in the Edison era. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Gitelman, L. (2014). Paper knowledge : toward a media history of documents. Duke University Press. https://getit.library.nyu.edu/go/9408185

Leslie, C., & Anderberg, L. (2015). Innovating with history: How an archival intervention diminishes Snow’s “dangerous” divides. Double Helix, 3(0). Retrieved from http://qudoublehelixjournal.org/index.php/dh/article/view/58

Leslie, C., & Anderberg, L. (2016). Making history active: Archival interventions for engineering education. In ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings (Vol. 2016–June). American Society for Engineering Education. https://www.asee.org/public/conferences/64/papers/15219/view

Nokia Bell Labs. (2016). History of Bell Labs – Bell Labs. Retrieved September 25, 2016, from https://www.bell-labs.com/about/history-bell-labs/

Snow, C. P. (1959). The two cultures and the scientific revolution. New York: Cambridge University Press. https://getit.library.nyu.edu/go/9408186